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I have to add methods to Class in execution time.

class ExtendableClass
end

The methods to add are declared in independent Classes.

module ExtensionClassOne
  def method_one
  end
end

module ExtensionClassTwo
  def method_two
  end
end

I'm looking for an (elegant) mechanism to add all the extension class methods into the ExtendableClass.

Approach 1

I'm thinking in explicily include the extension classes like:

ExtendableClass.send( :include, ExtensionClassOne )
ExtendableClass.send( :include, ExtensionClassTwo )

but it looks a little forced to have to call this private method every time I define a new extension class.

Approach 2

So I was looking for an automatic way to include this methods into my ExtendableClass class.

I'm thinking in declare an specific ancestor for this extension classes:

class ExtensionClassOne < Extension
  def method_one
  end
end

and then I'd need a mechanism to know all the childs of a class... something like the oposite of ancestors.

Once I have this list I can easily ExtendableClass.include all the list of classes. Even if I have to call to the private method here.

Approach 3

Also inheriting from the Extension class and detect in declaration time when this class is used as ancestor. In the way that the ActiveSupport.included method works, like an event binding. Then make the include there.

Any solution for implement approach 2 or approach 3? Do you recommend approach 1? New approachs?

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Should the instance methods of the extension class be instance or class methods in the extendable class? And must the extension classes be classes, or can they be modules? –  Linuxios Mar 23 '12 at 13:20
    
Your first method won't even execute because ExtensionClassOne & ExtensionClassOne are classes not modules. –  Andrew Marshall Mar 23 '12 at 13:31
    
@AndrewMarshall you're right, updated. –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 13:34
    
@Linux_iOS.rb.cpp.c.lisp.m.sh I have changed the extension classes and they are now modules. The finish behavior I'm looking for is to be able to call ExtendableClass.new.method_one, ExtendableClass.new.method_two ... –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 13:37
    
I'm having a bit of trouble figuring out what you are trying to achieve, but if you want to add the method to the class only at the point that you try to call it, could you leverage ruby's "method missing" functionality? rubylearning.com/satishtalim/ruby_method_missing.html –  Mikey Hogarth Mar 23 '12 at 13:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

@fguillen, you are right that the "explicit way is the cleanest approach". Since that is so, why don't you use the most "explicit" code which could be imagined:

class Extendable
end

class Extendable
  def method_one
    puts "method one"
  end
end

class Extendable
  def method_two
    puts "method two"
  end
end

...In other words, if you are defining a module which will be automatically included in a class as soon as it is defined, why bother with the module at all? Just add your "extension" methods directly to the class!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I didn't think in this... it makes my include solution to looks stupid :). It is a good point. I can defend the include solution saying that I have all the power in the plug method.. and I can modify this implementation to change the behavior of the pluggin system without change all the extension classes.. –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 20:59
    
@fguillen, you don't need to "defend" your solution, because I'm not attacking it. If you do need to do something more complex than just adding methods to a class, then yes, a more complex solution might be called for. If you don't need that flexibility right now, however, it would be better to start with something simple and refactor later if needed. –  Alex D Mar 24 '12 at 14:54
    
"defend" was only a way of talking :) –  fguillen Mar 24 '12 at 16:39

Approach 4 would be to define a macro on class level in Object

class Object
  def self.enable_extension
    include InstanceExtension
    extend ClassExtension
  end
end

and calling this macro in all your classes you want to be extended.

class Bacon
  enable_extension
end

Car.enable_extension

This way,

  • you don't have to use #send to circumvent encapsulation (Approach 1)
  • you can inherit from any Class you want, because everything inherits from Object anyway (except 1.9's BasicObject)
  • the usage of your extension is declarative and not hidden in some hook

Downside: you monkeypatch build-in Classes and may break the world. Choose long and decriptive names.

share|improve this answer
    
But the declarative extension will be longer than a simple enable_extension call, I should declare submodules InstanceExtension and ClassExtension in my extension class. –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 15:23
    
Of course you can namespace the above models, and you should. With declarative I meant that you (kind of) document your implementation so another developer (or you in 2 weeks) can still figure out what is going on. What do yo mean with extension class? The extend ed class or the modules you extend with? –  Niklas Mar 23 '12 at 15:48
    
I like the idea of self documented maybe the inherited hook is too much magic. When I say extension class I mean the modules you extend with. Still your approach is too much verbose. If I have to call enable_extension and also define inner-modules like InstanceExtension then I prefer to go to the explicit include on my Approach 1. –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 20:25

Edit: Given your answer to my comment on the question I suppose this is not what you wanted. I see no problem with your "Approach 1" in this case; it's what I'd do. Alternatively, instead of using send to bypass the private method, just re-open the class:

class ExtendableClass
  include ExtensionOne
end

Assuming I understand what you want, I'd do this:

module DelayedExtension
  def later_include( *modules )
    (@later_include||=[]).concat( modules )
  end
  def later_extend( *modules )
    (@later_extend||=[]).concat( modules )
  end
  def realize_extensions # better name needed
    include *@later_include unless !@later_include || @later_include.empty?
    extend  *@later_extend  unless !@later_extend  || @later_extend.empty?
  end
end

module ExtensionOne
end

module ExtensionTwo
  def self.included(klass)
    klass.extend ClassMethods
  end
  module ClassMethods
    def class_can_do_it!; end
  end
end

class ExtendableClass
  extend DelayedExtension
  later_include ExtensionOne, ExtensionTwo
end

original_methods = ExtendableClass.methods
p ExtendableClass.ancestors
#=> [ExtendableClass, Object, Kernel, BasicObject]

ExtendableClass.realize_extensions

p ExtendableClass.ancestors
#=> [ExtendableClass, ExtensionOne, ExtensionTwo, Object, Kernel, BasicObject]

p ExtendableClass.methods - original_methods
#=> [:class_can_do_it!]
share|improve this answer
    
I think I didn't explain my self very well, there is something important: the ExtendableClass (the one I want to add methods on the air) has not any idea about how many, or which are, the names of the modules it is extended with. This is because is tricky. I have to trigger the include mechanism in the modules that extend the class. Think that this modules are like plugins. –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 20:28
    
@fguillen I understand. Do you understand what I mean about "reopening the class" above, and how that is equivalent to your send? –  Phrogz Mar 23 '12 at 20:55
    
ah!.. yes.. you mean to write this piece of code together with every extension class implementation.. suppling the send(:include) call.. very interesting. +1 to this part.. but the second part looks too much over-engineering. :) –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 21:03
    
@fguillen Yes, that is what I meant. The second part (below the ---) was before I saw your response. It is not applicable to your problem, but I was loathe to delete it after hard minutes of work on it ;) –  Phrogz Mar 23 '12 at 21:24

The included method is actually a hook. It is called whenever you are inherited from:

module Extensions
  def someFunctionality()
    puts "Doing work..."
  end
end
class Foo
  def self.inherited(klass)
    klass.send(:include, Extensions) #Replace self with a different module if you want
  end
end
class Bar < Foo
end
Bar.new.someFunctionality                  #=> "Doing work..."

There is also the included hook, which is called when you are included:

module Baz
  def self.included(klass)
    puts "Baz was included into #{klass}"
  end
end
class Bork
  include Baz
end

Output:

Baz was included into Bork
share|improve this answer
    
This looked very nice, but I have been making tests and I have found that I can't use the inherited hook because only classes can inherit and only modules can be included so one thing negates the other. Also what I'm looking would be the someFunctionality method to be declared in Bar and ending with the possibility of Foo.new.someFunctionality because in your example Bar is inheriting from Foo so, of course, it will have a someFunctionality method. –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 15:35
    
+1 for the inherited hook explanation. –  fguillen Mar 23 '12 at 21:04
    
@fguillen: How do they negate the other? –  Linuxios Mar 24 '12 at 3:52
    
@ Linux_iOS.rb.cpp.c.lisp.m.sh: only a Class can inherit of other Class so only a Class can be the argument of the inherited hook. But only a Module can be the argument for the include method. –  fguillen Mar 24 '12 at 10:09
    
@fguillen: Sorry, that was a mistake. I have updated my answer. –  Linuxios Mar 24 '12 at 13:10

A very tricky solution, I think too much over-engineering, would be to take the inherited hook that @Linux_iOS.rb.cpp.c.lisp.m.sh has commented and keep all and every child class in a Set and combined it with the @Mikey Hogarth proposition of method_missing to look for all this child class methods every time I call a method in the Extendable class. Something like this:

# code simplified and no tested
# extendable.rb
class Extendable
  @@delegators = []

  def self.inherited( klass )
    @@delegators << klass
  end

  def self.method_missing
    # ... searching in all @@delegators methods
  end
end

# extensions/extension_one.rb
class ExtensionOne < Extendable
  def method_one
  end
end

But the logic of the method_missing (and respond_to?) is gonna be very complicate and dirty.

I don't like this solution, just let it here to study it like a possibility.

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After a very interesting propositions you have done I have realized that the explicit way is the cleanest approach. If we add a few recommendations taking from your answers I think I'm gonna go for this:

# extendable.rb
class Extendable
  def self.plug( _module )
    include( _module )
  end
end

# extensions/extension_one.rb
module ExtensionOne
  def method_one
    puts "method one"
  end
end
Extendable.plug( ExtensionOne )

# extensions/extension_two.rb
module ExtensionTwo
  def method_two
    puts "method two"
  end
end
Extendable.plug( ExtensionTwo )

# result
Extendable.new.method_one # => "method one"
Extendable.new.method_two # => "method two"
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