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I´m using Mysql since quite a while and am really confused by the result of a simple LEFT JOIN on three Tables.

I have the following three tables (I created an example, to narrow it down)

a) persons

+----------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field    | Type        | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+----------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| PersonID | int(11)     | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| Name     | varchar(50) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| Age      | int(11)     | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+----------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

b) person_fav_artists

+----------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field          | Type         | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+----------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| FavInterpretID | int(10)      | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| PersonID       | int(10)      | NO   |     | 0       |                |
| Interpret      | varchar(100) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+----------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

c) person_fav_movies

+------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field      | Type         | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| FavMovieID | int(10)      | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| PersonID   | int(10)      | NO   |     | 0       |                |
| Movie      | varchar(100) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

My example tables are used to store an any number of artists and movies to a single person. Weather this makes sence or not doesn´t really matter since it´s just a simple example.

Now I have the following data in the tables:

mysql> SELECT * FROM persons;
+----------+------+------+
| PersonID | Name | Age  |
+----------+------+------+
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |
|        2 | Lisa |   15 |
|        3 | Jon  |   30 |
+----------+------+------+

mysql> SELECT * FROM person_fav_artists;
+----------------+----------+----------------+
| FavInterpretID | PersonID | Interpret      |
+----------------+----------+----------------+
|              1 |        1 | Linkin Park    |
|              2 |        1 | Muse           |
|              3 |        2 | Madonna        |
|              4 |        2 | Katy Perry     |
|              5 |        2 | Britney Spears |
|              6 |        1 | Fort Minor     |
|              7 |        1 | Jay Z          |
+----------------+----------+----------------+

mysql> SELECT * FROM person_fav_movies;
+------------+----------+-------------------+
| FavMovieID | PersonID | Movie             |
+------------+----------+-------------------+
|          1 |        1 | American Pie 1    |
|          2 |        1 | American Pie 2    |
|          3 |        1 | American Pie 3    |
|          4 |        3 | A Game of Thrones |
|          5 |        3 | Eragon            |
+------------+----------+-------------------+

Now i´m simply joining the tables with the following query:

Select * FROM persons
LEFT JOIN person_fav_artists USING (PersonID)
LEFT JOIN person_fav_movies USING (PersonID);

which returns the following result:

+----------+------+------+----------------+----------------+------------+-------------------+
| PersonID | Name | Age  | FavInterpretID | Interpret      | FavMovieID | Movie             |
+----------+------+------+----------------+----------------+------------+-------------------+
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              1 | Linkin Park    |          1 | American Pie 1    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              1 | Linkin Park    |          2 | American Pie 2    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              1 | Linkin Park    |          3 | American Pie 3    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              2 | Muse           |          1 | American Pie 1    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              2 | Muse           |          2 | American Pie 2    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              2 | Muse           |          3 | American Pie 3    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              6 | Fort Minor     |          1 | American Pie 1    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              6 | Fort Minor     |          2 | American Pie 2    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              6 | Fort Minor     |          3 | American Pie 3    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              7 | Jay Z          |          1 | American Pie 1    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              7 | Jay Z          |          2 | American Pie 2    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              7 | Jay Z          |          3 | American Pie 3    |
|        2 | Lisa |   15 |              3 | Madonna        |       NULL | NULL              |
|        2 | Lisa |   15 |              4 | Katy Perry     |       NULL | NULL              |
|        2 | Lisa |   15 |              5 | Britney Spears |       NULL | NULL              |
|        3 | Jon  |   30 |           NULL | NULL           |          4 | A Game of Thrones |
|        3 | Jon  |   30 |           NULL | NULL           |          5 | Eragon            |
+----------+------+------+----------------+----------------+------------+-------------------+
17 rows in set (0.00 sec)

So far so good. My question is now if it´s "normal" that '12' Rows are returned for the person 'Jeff' despite the fact that he only has four 'artists' and three 'movies' assigned to him. I think I may understand why the result is as it is, but I think it´s quite stupid to return so many Rows for so less actual data.

So is there something wrong with my query or is this behaviour on purpose?

The result I´d like to have would be like the following (only for Jeff):

+----------+------+------+----------------+----------------+------------+-------------------+
| PersonID | Name | Age  | FavInterpretID | Interpret      | FavMovieID | Movie             |
+----------+------+------+----------------+----------------+------------+-------------------+
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              1 | Linkin Park    |          1 | American Pie 1    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              2 | Muse           |          2 | American Pie 2    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              3 | Fort Minor     |          3 | American Pie 3    |
|        1 | Jeff |   22 |              4 | Jay Z          |          1 | NULL              | <- 'American Pie 1/2/3' would be OK as well.
+----------+------+------+----------------+----------------+------------+-------------------+

Thanks for your help!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are getting the correct result with the 12 records becuase that is the correct tuple with the way you are asking for the data. I am not sure why you are joinming these 3 tables together becuase inherently, the 2 related tables are not the same type of data. What I would suggest is that you select person & movies and then you can union person & artists, becuase your union will want the columns to be the same, i would suggest adding a type to differentiate from artists and movies and then the nice name should just be AS a string_value

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! I already thougth that this is the "correct" result since it returns all possible combinations. About your question: I´m joining the Tables to create a Object "Person" in C# which has then Lists which contain the "Movies" and "Artists". I´m using this Query to create the whole object therefore I join everything together. Maybe it would be cleverer to do it seperately but then I´d have a lot more queries... –  user1288392 Mar 23 '12 at 14:57
    
If you are using a C# object that has the ability to "Filter" the records, you could of course use the filter the data and apply that to your object/view then re-filter and apply that to the other object/view. This would keep your SQL pull a single pull, though I would suggest not. The time it takes to join the data from the third table would be the same as doing a second statement becuase your first table is cached –  Craig Trombly Mar 23 '12 at 15:32
    
Yes you are right, my C# object kind of "filters" the result from the Mysql-Query. Which means that duplicate Rows are just ignored. I´m not shure i understood the second part of your answer. Do you mean I should use more queries instead of one big as I´ve done in my example? Which would mean that i have to create a separate query for movies and one for artists. –  user1288392 Mar 23 '12 at 16:42
    
From a keeping your code simpler and more elegant, yes I would suggest it. Also, having them seperate keeps your code just a little more flexible for any "modifications" that may be necessary due to new specifications. For Instance, "not that it may happen, but what if" say your client now asks for a Rating to be diplayed with each movie, well you could add that to your current SQL which now greatly increases the CPU processing on the server as this grows, where it would only do what was needed if they were seperate –  Craig Trombly Mar 23 '12 at 19:06
    
Ok, I see your point. The down-side of course would be that there are a lot more separate queries which means a lot more traffic from the client to the server. That may lead to a worse performance when working for example through a VPN but I´m going to try it nevertheless. Thanks again for your help! –  user1288392 Mar 24 '12 at 11:18

Nothing wrong with query or the results, it is just returning all possible combinations. One option would be to split into two separate queries if the amount of data is going to be large.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I just hoped that there would be a way without splitting the queries but then I´m going to give the splitting a try. –  user1288392 Mar 23 '12 at 15:01

This behaviour is on purpose.

  1. Your first table has 1 columns for Jeff.
  2. The second table has 4 columns for Jeff, so the joined table gives 1x4.
  3. The third table has 3 columns for Jeff, so the joined table gives 1x4x3.

You now got all possible combinations.

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I think it's normal since it's taking all the combinations of fav movie and fav artist. I think this is how the joining works.

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Try by replacing LEFT JOIN with INNER JOIN as:

     SELECT * 
     FROM persons 
     INNER JOIN person_fav_artists USING (PersonID) 
     INNER JOIN person_fav_movies USING (PersonID); 
share|improve this answer
    
Using an "INNER JOIN" won´t work nor will it reduce the resulting Rows for the Person "Jeff". It would only lead to a result without "Lisa" and "Jon". –  user1288392 Mar 23 '12 at 14:54

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