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How can I find the the first substring until I find the first digit?

Example:

my $string = 'AAAA_BBBB_12_13_14' ;

Result expected: 'AAAA_BBBB_'

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2  
What have you tried? –  Carl Norum Mar 23 '12 at 15:23
1  
Wow. Every answer so far is wrong. –  brian d foy Mar 23 '12 at 19:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Judging from the tags you want to use a regular expression. So let's build this up.

This gives us the following regular expression:

^\D+

Which we can use in code like so:

my $string = 'AAAA_BBBB_12_13_14';
$string =~ /^\D+/;
my $result = $&;
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if you use : /(\d)/ - regex, which search FIRST digit in string and after this you have $` - var, which contain string before matching –  gaussblurinc Mar 23 '12 at 15:30
    
@loldop - That method fails if the string has no digits to match as it returns a blank string rather than the whole string. –  Dave Webb Mar 23 '12 at 15:40
    
it isn't a task (find a first digit) and if there're no digits, his program will do something else: $str =~ /(\d)/ and foo($`) or foo2(); –  gaussblurinc Mar 23 '12 at 15:47
1  
You have a couple problem here. First, Perl only sets the match variables on a successful match, so you need to check the result of the match operator so you don't get left over values from previous matches. Second, the $& is going to slow down all your matches with it's very well known performance issue. You don't need it here. Just use a capture. –  brian d foy Mar 23 '12 at 19:01

Most people got half of the answer right, but they missed several key points.

  • You can only trust the match variables after a successful match. Don't use them unless you know you had a successful match.

  • The $&, $``, and$'` have well known performance penalties across all regexes in your program.

  • You need to anchor the match to the beginning of the string. Since Perl now has user-settable default match flags, you want to stay away from the ^ beginning of line anchor. The \A beginning of string anchor won't change what it does even with default flags.

This would work:

my $substring = $string =~ m/\A(\D+)/ ? $1 : undef;

If you really wanted to use something like $&, use Perl 5.10's per-match version instead. The /p switch provides non-global-perfomance-sucking versions:

my $substring = $string =~ m/\A\D+/p ? ${^MATCH} : undef;

If you're worried about what might be in \D, you can specify the character class yourself instead of using the shortcut:

my $substring = $string =~ m/\A[^0-9]+/p ? ${^MATCH} : undef;

I don't particularly like the conditional operator here, so I would probably use the match in list context:

my( $substring ) = $string =~ m/\A([^0-9]+)/;

If there must be a number in the string (so, you don't match an entire string that has no digits, you can throw in a lookahead, which won't be part of the capture:

my( $substring ) = $string =~ m/\A([^0-9]+)(?=[0-9])/;
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I kinda like /\A(\D*)/ && $1 myself. Don’t see why to bother with a /(pat)/ ? $1 : undef most of the time, given that && $1 is usually good enough. People don’t use && as much for its string potential as they could. –  tchrist Mar 23 '12 at 22:28
  $str =~ /(\d)/; print $`;

This code print string, which stand before matching

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$str =~ /(\d)/; print $` –  gaussblurinc Mar 23 '12 at 15:26
2  
This doesn't work if the string has no digits in it. For example if $string = 'AAAA_BBBB' I would expect 'AAAA_BBBB' to be returned but this returns an empty string as there is no digit to match. –  Dave Webb Mar 23 '12 at 15:39
    
$str=~/(\d)/ and print $` or print $str; –  gaussblurinc Mar 23 '12 at 15:43
1  
You have a couple problem here. First, Perl only sets the match variables on a successful match, so you need to check the result of the match operator so you don't get left over values from previous matches. Second, the $` is going to slow down all your matches with it's very well known performance issue. –  brian d foy Mar 23 '12 at 19:01
perl -le '$string=q(AAAA_BBBB_12_13_14);$string=~m{(\D+)} and print $1'
AAAA_BBBB_
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1  
You need to anchor that match so you start from the beginning of the string instead of perhaps matching non-digits after the first digit. –  brian d foy Mar 23 '12 at 19:11

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