Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I've got a string that looks like "012 + 2 - 01 + 24" for example. I want to be able to quickly (less code) evaluate that expression...

I could use eval() on the string, but I don't want 012 to be represented in octal form (10), I want it to be represented as an int (12).

My solution for this works, but it is not elegant. I am sort of assuming that there is a really good pythonic way to do this.

My solution:

#expression is some string that looks like "012 + 2 - 01 + 24"
atomlist = []
for atom in expression.split():
    if "+" not in atom and "-" not in atom:
        atomlist.append(int(atom))
    else:
        atomlist.append(atom)
#print atomlist
evalstring = ""
for atom in atomlist:
    evalstring+=str(atom)    
#print evalstring
num = eval(evalstring)

Basically, I tear appart the string, and find numbers in it and turn them into ints, and then I rebuild the string with the ints (essentially removing leading 0's except where 0 is a number on its own).

How can this be done better?

share|improve this question
1  
Side note: eval('012') will raise a SyntaxError in Python 3 :) –  Rik Poggi Mar 23 '12 at 17:07
    
@RikPoggi: That is a very interesting side note... –  Dream Lane Mar 23 '12 at 18:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'd be tempted to use regular expressions to remove the leading zeroes:

>>> re.sub(r'\b0+(?!\b)', '', '012 + 2 + 0 - 01 + 204 - 0')
'12 + 2 + 0 - 1 + 204 - 0'

This removes zeroes at the start of every number, except when the number consists entirely of zeroes:

  • the first \b matches a word (token) boundary;
  • the 0+ matches one or more consecutive zeroes;
  • the (?!\b) (negative lookahead) inhibits matches where the sequence of zeroes is followed by a token boundary.

One advantage of this approach over split()-based alternatives is that it doesn't require spaces in order to work:

>>> re.sub(r'\b0+(?!\b)', '', '012+2+0-01+204-0')
'12+2+0-1+204-0'
share|improve this answer
    
One more reason why I need to start learning regular expressions –  Dream Lane Mar 23 '12 at 17:03

You can do this in one line using lstrip() to strip off any leading zeros:

>>> eval("".join(token.lstrip('0') for token in s.split()))
37
share|improve this answer
2  
What about s = '0 * 10'? –  Rik Poggi Mar 23 '12 at 16:49
    
Good point! Not sure there's any easy way around this using my approach. –  grifaton Mar 23 '12 at 17:01
    
+1'd for a good answer anyways. In my particular case the only operations are + and - –  Dream Lane Mar 23 '12 at 17:02
    
One way to fix the problem would be to use token.lstrip('0') if token.lstrip('0') else token or something. It would still maybe be a little too accepting ("00+" would become "+"). –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 19:20

I'd like to do it this way:

>>> s = '012 + 2 + 0 - 01 + 204 - 0'
>>> ' '.join(str(int(x)) if x.isdigit() else x for x in s.split())
'12 + 2 + 0 - 1 + 204 - 0'

Use float() if you want to handle them too :)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for selfish reasons; this is the first thing I thought of. –  DSM Mar 23 '12 at 19:19

int does not assume that a leading zero indicates an octal number:

In [26]: int('012')
Out[26]: 12

Accordingly, you can safely evalute the expression with the following code

from operator import add, sub
from collections import deque

def mapper(item, opmap = {'+': add, '-': sub}):
    try: return int(item)
    except ValueError: pass

    return opmap[item]

stack = deque()
# if item filters out empty strings between whitespace sequences
for item in (mapper(item) for item in "012 + 2 - 01 + 24".split(' ') if item):
    if stack and callable(stack[-1]):
        f = stack.pop()
        stack.append(f(stack.pop(), item))
    else: stack.append(item)

print stack.pop()

Not a one-liner, but it is safe, because you control all of the functions which can be executed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.