Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why doesn't this work right?

function test() { 
    var start = new Date(2012, 3, 31, 19, 0, 0); // 3/31/2012 7:00 PM
    var end = new Date(2012, 4, 1, 1, 0, 0);     // 4/01/2012 1:00 AM

    if (end < start)
        console.log("oops!");
    else
        console.log("works!");
}

Output:

oops!

share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of JavaScript Date Object Comparison –  Pekka 웃 Mar 23 '12 at 17:11
2  
Why is this a bug? Your start is actually after your end given the dates you've created. 3 is April, which only has 30 days, but you've set the date to 31, which makes it May. Months use a 0 index. –  kinakuta Mar 23 '12 at 17:12
1  
@AdrianIftode - No, 3 is for April - Months are 0-based. –  Jakub Konecki Mar 23 '12 at 17:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Months are 0-based in js

var start = new Date(2012, 2, 31, 19, 0, 0); // 3/31/2012 7:00 PM
var end = new Date(2012, 3, 1, 1, 0, 0);     // 4/01/2012 1:00 AM

In your case both start and end are 1 May 2012. Just output the values and you'll see.

share|improve this answer

Your dates actually resolve to

Tue May 01 2012 19:00:00 GMT-0700 (PDT)
Tue May 01 2012 01:00:00 GMT-0700 (PDT)

From DateMDN:

month
Integer value representing the month, beginning with 0 for January to 11 for December.

share|improve this answer

I assume you want to see which date comes before the other, right?

When you compare the two you aren't comparing the actual dates you're comparing objects. Try if(end.valueOf() < start.valueOf()) { //do stuff }

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.