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You have a Python class which needs an equals test. Python should use duck-typing but is it (better/more accurate) to include or exclude an isinstance test in the eq function? For example:

class Trout(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

    def __eq__(self, other):
        return isinstance(other, Trout) and self.value == other.value
share|improve this question
1  
I think this is a legitimate use case for isinstance. – Niklas B. Mar 23 '12 at 17:15
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Using isinstance in __eq__ methods is pretty common. The reason for this is that if the __eq__ method fails, it can fallback on an __eq__ method from another object. Most normal methods are called explicitly, but __eq__ is called implicitly, so it requires look-before-you-leap more frequently.

EDIT (thanks for the reminder, Sven Marnach):

To make it fallback, you can return the NotImplemented singleton, as in this example:

class Trout(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

    def __eq__(self, other):
        if isinstance(other, Trout):
            return self.value == other.value
        else:
            return NotImplemented

Suppose a RainbowTrout knows how to compare itself to a Trout or to another RainbowTrout, but a Trout only knows how to compare itself to a Trout. In this example, if you test mytrout == myrainbowtrout, Python will first call mytrout.__eq__(myrainbowtrout), notice that it fails, and then call myrainbowtrout.__eq__(mytrout), which succeeds.

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While this answer is true, it doesn't explain how to implement __eq__() in a way that actually facilitates a fallback to the other object's __eq__(). – Sven Marnach Mar 23 '12 at 17:59
    
@SvenMarnach, good point. I'll edit. – amcnabb Mar 23 '12 at 18:01

Using isintsance() is usually fine in __eq__() methods. You shouldn't return False immediately if the isinstance() check fails, though -- it is better to return NotImplemented to give other.__eq__() a chance of being executed:

def __eq__(self, other):
    if isinstance(other, Trout):
        return self.x == other.x
    return NotImplemented

This will become particularly important in class hierarchies where more than one class defines __eq__():

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.x = x
    def __eq__(self, other):
        if isinstance(other, A):
            return self.x == other.x
        return NotImplemented
class B(A):
    def __init__(self, x, y):
        A.__init__(self, x)
        self.y = y
    def __eq__(self, other):
        if isinstance(other, B):
            return self.x, self.y == other.x, other.y
        return NotImplemented

If you would return False immediately, as you did in your original code, you would lose symmetry between A(3) == B(3, 4) and B(3, 4) == A(3).

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The "duck-typing" principle is that you don't care what other is, as long as it has a value attribute. So unless your attributes share names with conflicting semantics, I'd suggest doing it like this:

def __eq__(self, other):
    try:
        return self.value == other.value
    except AttributeError:
        return False # or whatever

(Alternately you could test whether other has a value attribute, but "it's easier to ask forgiveness than to get permission")

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3  
This might result in something very silly, like Trout("rainbow") == Lorikeet("rainbow"), even though hardly anyone would consider fish equal to birds. – SingleNegationElimination Mar 23 '12 at 17:38
1  
@Token, in that case duck typing is not right for you. These would only come out equal if they both store "rainbow" in the attribute "value", by the way. – alexis Mar 23 '12 at 22:01
    
... and you define their __eq__ method as the OP wants, to only look at the value field. But yes, that's the duck typing principle. Love it or leave it. – alexis Mar 23 '12 at 22:19
    
A rather significant drawback of this approach though is that the try/except is much slower (about 60% when I did a test). See gist.github.com/2950940 Arguably the try/except is more Pythonic, but I'd rather have fast non-pythonic code than slow pythonic code. :) – Adam Parkin Jun 18 '12 at 21:52
    
Python exceptions are designed to be very fast, but of course they won't be as fast as a simple type look-up. Unless you're using this for numeric processing, though, I'd be more worried about optimizing programmer productivity (read: extension-friendly design) than about shaving milliseconds. – alexis Jun 21 '12 at 19:03

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