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I cannot seem to find a way to have LINQ return the value from a specified accessor. I know the name of the accessors for each object, but am unsure if it is possible to pass the requested accessor as a variable or otherwise achieve the desired refactoring.

Consider the following code snippet:

// "value" is some object with accessors like: format, channels, language
row = new List<String> {
String.Join(innerSeparator, (from item in myObject.Audio
    orderby item.Key ascending
    select item.Value.format).ToArray()),
String.Join(innerSeparator, (from item in myObject.Audio
    orderby item.Key ascending
    select item.Value.channels).ToArray()),
String.Join(innerSeparator, (from item in myObject.Audio
    orderby item.Key ascending
    select item.Value.language).ToArray()),
// ...
}

I'd like to refactor this into a method that uses the specified accessor, or perhaps pass a delegate, though I don't see how that could work.

string niceRefactor(myObj myObject, string /* or whatever type */ ____ACCESSOR) {
    return String.Join(innerSeparator, (from item in myObject.Audio
            orderby item.Key ascending
            select item.Value.____ACCESSOR).ToArray());
}

I have written a decent amount of C#, but am still new to the magic of LINQ. Is this the right approach? How would you refactor this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can pass a Func<AudioType, object> to select the property you want:

string niceRefactor(myObj myObject, Func<AudioType,object> propertySelector)
{
    return String.Join(innerSeparator, (from item in myObject.Audio
                                        orderby item.Key ascending
                                        select propertySelector(item.value)).ToArray());
}

This assumes that AudioType is the type of the value items returned by the Audio key value pairs.

You can then call your method e.g. like this:

string result = niceRefactor(myObject, x => x.format);
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how will he call this function ?please supply sample –  Royi Namir Mar 23 '12 at 17:33
    
thanks - just as i thought. :)........ –  Royi Namir Mar 23 '12 at 17:37

I'd extract the most obvious commonality to start with:

var audioItems = myObject.Audio.OrderBy(item => item.Key);
row = new List<String> {
    String.Join(innerSeparator, audioItems.Select(x => x.Value).ToArray());
    String.Join(innerSeparator, audioItems.Select(x => x.Format).ToArray());
    String.Join(innerSeparator, audioItems.Select(x => x.Channels).ToArray());
    String.Join(innerSeparator, audioItems.Select(x => x.Language).ToArray());
}

If I were using .NET 4, I'd then remove the ToArray calls as string.Join has more overloads now:

var audioItems = myObject.Audio.OrderBy(item => item.Key);
row = new List<String> {
    String.Join(innerSeparator, audioItems.Select(x => x.Value));
    String.Join(innerSeparator, audioItems.Select(x => x.Format));
    String.Join(innerSeparator, audioItems.Select(x => x.Channels));
    String.Join(innerSeparator, audioItems.Select(x => x.Language));
}

I might stop there. But if you wanted, you could always add another extension method:

public static string Separate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, string separator)
{
    return string.Join(separator, items);
}

Then:

var audioItems = myObject.Audio.OrderBy(item => item.Key);
row = new List<String> {
    audioItems.Select(x => x.Value).Separate(innerSeparator));
    audioItems.Select(x => x.Format).Separate(innerSeparator));
    audioItems.Select(x => x.Channels).Separate(innerSeparator));
    audioItems.Select(x => x.Language).Separate(innerSeparator);
}

I'd almost certainly stop there. You could keep going:

public static IEnumerable<string> ProjectAndSeparateMany<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> items, string separator, Func<T, object>... projections)
{
    return projections.Select(projection => items.Select(projection)
                                                 .Separate(separator);
}

And call it with:

var audioItems = myObject.Audio.OrderBy(item => item.Key);
row = audioItems.ProjectAndSeparateMany(innerSeparator,
         x => x.Value, x => x.Format, x => x.Channels, x => x.Language).ToList();

... but at that point it's so specialist, I doubt that I'd ever use it again...

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I'd like to refactor this into a method that uses the specified accessor, or perhaps pass a delegate, though I don't see how that could work.

You could do this using the object syntax and passing a delegate (This is assuming that your .Value is of type MyValueType):

string NiceRefactor(MyObj myObject, Func<MyValueType, string> accessor)
{
     return string.Join(innerSeparator, myObject.Audio.OrderBy(m => m.Key).Select(m => accessor(m.Value));
}

Using this, you can write:

// "value" is some object with accessors like: format, channels, language
row = new List<String> {
    NiceRefactor(myObject, v => v.format),
    NiceRefactor(myObject, v => v.channels),
    NiceRefactor(myObject, v => v.language),
    // ...
}
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You could do something like that:

// "value" is some object with accessors like: format, channels, language
row = new List<String> {
    JoinProperties(myObject.Audio, innerSeparator, x => x.format),
    JoinProperties(myObject.Audio, innerSeparator, x => x.channels),
    JoinProperties(myObject.Audio, innerSeparator, x => x.language),
// ...
}


...


public string JoinProperties<TKey, TValue, TProperty>(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, string separator, Func<TValue, TProperty> selector)
{
    return string.Join(separator, dictionary.OrderBy(kvp => kvp.Key).Select(kvp => selector(kvp.Value)));
}
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