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I have a file containing records delimited by the pattern /#matchee/. These records are of varying lengths ...say 45 - 75 lines. They need to ALL be 45 lines and still maintain the record delimiter. Records can be from different departments, department name is on line 2 following a blank line. So record delimiter could be thought of as simply /^#matchee/ or /^matchee/ followed by \n. There is a Deluxe edition of this problem and a Walmart edition ...

DELUXE EDITION

Pull each record by pattern range so I can sort records by department. Eg., with sed

sed -n '/^DEPARTMENT NAME/,/^#matchee/{p;}' mess-o-records.txt

Then, Print only the first 45 lines of each record in the file to conform to the 45 line constraint.

Finally, make sure the result still has the record delimiter on line 45.

WALMART EDITION

Same as above, but instead of using a range, just use the record delimiter.

STATUS

My attempt at this might clarify what I'm trying to do.

sed -n -e '/^DEPARTMENT-A/,/^#matchee/{p;}' -e '45q' -e '$s/.*/#matchee/' mess-o-records.txt

This doesn't work, of course, because sed is operating on the entire file at each command. I need it to operate on each range match not the whole file.

SAMPLE INPUT - 80 Lines ( truncated for space )

<blank line>
DEPARTMENT-A
Office space 206
Anonymous, MI 99999

Harold O Nonymous
Buckminster Abbey
Anonymous, MI 99999

item A     Socket B     45454545
item B     Gizmo Z      76767676
<too many lines here>
<way too many lines here>  


#matchee

SAMPLE OUTPUT - now only 45 lines

<blank line>
DEPARTMENT-A
Office space 206
Anonymous, MI 99999

Harold O Nonymous
Buckminster Abbey
Anonymous, MI 99999

item A     Socket B     45454545
item B     Gizmo Z      76767676
<Record now equals exactly 45 lines>  
<yet record delimiter is maintained>

#matchee

CLARIFICATION UPDATE

I will never need more than the first 40 lines if this makes things easier. Maybe the process would be:

  • Match pattern(s)
  • Print first 40 lines.
  • Pad to appropriate length. Eg., 45 lines.
  • Tack delimiter back on. Eg., #matchee

I think this would be more flexible -- Ie., can handle record shorter than 45 lines.

Here's a riff based on @Borodin's Perl example below:

my $count = 0;
$/ = "#matchee";    

while (<>) {
    if (/^REDUNDANCY.*DEPT/) {
        print;
        $count = 0;
    }   
    else {
        print if $count++ < 40; 
        print "\r\n" x 5; 
        print "#matchee\r\n";
    }   
}

This add 5 newlines to each record + the delimiting pattern /#matchee/. So it's wrong -- but it illustrates what I want.

Print 40 lines based on department -- pad -- tack delimiter back on.

share|improve this question
    
It would probably help if you gave examples of your input and expected output. –  CanSpice Mar 23 '12 at 17:25
    
@CanSpice - Done and done. –  Bubnoff Mar 23 '12 at 17:34
    
Have you tried piping each of your sed -e commands into each other? –  Jim Schubert Mar 23 '12 at 17:46
    
@Bubnoff: I hope you mean 45, not 65? Else you've completely lost me! –  Borodin Mar 23 '12 at 18:13
    
Sorry @Borodin, meant 45 lines. –  Bubnoff Mar 23 '12 at 18:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I understand what you want. Not sure about the bit about pull each record by pattern range. Is #matchee always followed by a blank line and then the department line? So in fact record number 2?

This Perl fragment does what I understand you need.

If you prefer you can put the input file on the command line and drop the open call. Then the loop would have to be while (<>) { ... }.

Let us know if this is right so far, and what more you need from it.

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $fh, '<', 'mess-o-records.txt' or die $!;

my $count = 0;

while (<$fh>) {
  if (/^#matchee/) {
    print;
    $count = 0;
  }
  else {
    print if $count++ < 45;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So far, this seems to work perfectly. Need to test more. How would you handle records that were less than 45 lines? –  Bubnoff Mar 23 '12 at 19:16
    
As to your pattern range question: I'd like to be able to define a record as starting with a pattern based on department and ending with the delimiting pattern. –  Bubnoff Mar 23 '12 at 19:19
    
How would you solve this if $/ was set to #matchee, then matched on the department name ...Eg., /^REDUNDANCY.*DEPT$/? –  Bubnoff Mar 23 '12 at 19:21
    
Records shorter than 45 lines are simply copied in their entirety. If you read the entire record in at one time you then have to split it into lines to limit it to 45. I suggest you trim the records to length as a first step and then sort them afterwards in a second pass. –  Borodin Mar 23 '12 at 22:10
    
How would you go about trimming each record. I am trying using the $. operator and getting nowhere. –  Bubnoff Mar 23 '12 at 22:23

I know this has already had an accepted answer, but I figured I'd post an awk example for anyone interested. It's not 100%, but it gets the job done.

Note This numbers the lines so you can verify the script is working as expected. Remove the i, from print i, current[i] to remove the line numbers.

dep.awk

BEGIN { RS = "#matchee\n\n" }

$0 ~ /[a-zA-Z0-9]+/ {
    split($0, current, "\n")
    for (i = 1; i <= 45; i++) {
        print i, current[i];
    }
    print "#matchee\n"
}

In this example, you begin the script by setting the record separator (RS) to "#matchee\n\n". There are two newlines because the first ends the line on which #matchee occurs and the second is the blank line on its own.

The match validates that a record contains letters or numbers to be valid. You could also check that the match starts with 'DEPARTMENT-', but this would fail if there is a stray newline. Checking the content is the safest route. Because this uses a block record (i.e., DEPARTMENT-A through #matchee), you could either pass $0 through awk or sed again, or use the awk split function and loop through 45 lines. In awk, the arrays aren't zero-indexed.

The print function includes a newline, so the block ends with print "#matchee\n" only instead of the double \n in the record separator variable.

You could also drop the same awk script into a bash script and change the number of lines and field separator. Of course, you should add validations and whatnot, but here's the start:

dep.sh

#!/bin/bash
# prints the first n lines within every block of text delimited by splitter
splitter=$1
numlines=$2

awk 'BEGIN { RS="'$1'\n\n" }
$0 ~ /[a-zA-Z0-9]+/ {
    split($0, current, "\n")
    for(i=1;i<='$numlines';i++) {
        print i, current[i]
    }
    print "'$splitter'", "\n"
}' $3

Make the script executable and run it.

./dep.sh '#matchee' 45 input.txt > output.txt

I added these files to a gist so you could also verify the output

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the awk. Easily plugged into my current script. –  Bubnoff Mar 31 '12 at 20:38

This might work for you:

D="DEPARTMENT-A" M="#matchee"
sed '/'"$D/,/$M"'/{/'"$D"'/{h;d};H;/'"$M"'/{x;:a;s/\n/&'"$M"'/45;tb;s/'"$M"'/\n&/;ta;:b;s/\('"$M"'\).*/\1/;p};d}' file

Explanation:

  • Focus on range of lines /DEPARTMENT/,/#matchee/
    • At start of range move pattern space (PS) to hold space (HS) and delete PS /DEPARTMENT/{h;d}
    • All subsequent lines in the range append to HS and delete H....;d
    • At end of range:/#matchee/
      • Swap to HS x
      • Test for 45 lines in range and if successful append #matchee at the 45th line s/\n/&#matchee/45
      • If previous substitution was successful branch to label b. tb
      • If previous substitution was unsuccessful insert a linefeed before #matchee s/'"$M"'/\n&/ thus lengthening a short record to 45 lines.
      • Branch to label a and test for 45 lines etc . ta
      • Replace the first occurrence of #matchee to the end of the line by it's self. s/\('"$M"'\).*/\1/ thus shortening a long record to 45 lines.
      • Print the range of records. p
  • All non-range records pass through untouched.
share|improve this answer
    
((*#%%zz{ +++ATH OK –  Kaz Mar 24 '12 at 18:25

TXR Solution ( http://www.nongnu.org/txr )

For illustration purposes using the fake data, I shorten the requirement from 40 lines to 12 lines. We find records beginning with a department name, delimited by #matchee. We dump them, chopped to no more than 12 lines, with #matchee added again.

@(collect)
@  (all)
@dept
@  (and)
@    (collect)
@line
@    (until)
#matchee
@    (end)
@  (end)
@(end)
@(output)
@  (repeat)
@{line[0..12] "\n"}
#matchee
@  (end)
@(end)

Here, the dept variable is expected to come from a -D command line option, but of course the code can be changed to accept it as an argument and put out a usage if it is missing.

Run on the sample data:

$ txr -Ddept=DEPARTMENT-A trim-extract.txr mess-o-records.txt 
DEPARTMENT-A
Office space 206
Anonymous, MI 99999

Harold O Nonymous
Buckminster Abbey
Anonymous, MI 99999

item A     Socket B     45454545
item B     Gizmo Z      76767676

<too many lines here>
#matchee

The blank lines before DEPARTMENT-A are gone, and there are exactly 12 lines, which happen to include one line of the <too many ...> junk.

Note that the semantics of @(until) is such that the #matchee is excluded from the collected material. So it is correct to unconditionally add it in the @(output) clause. This program will work even if a record happens to be shorter than 12 lines before #matchee is found.

It will not match a record if #matchee is not found.

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