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So recently i was thinking about strcpy and back to K&R where they show the implementation as

while (*dst++ = *src++) ;

However I mistakenly transcribed it as:

while (*dst = *src)
{
    src++; //technically could be ++src on these lines
    dst++; 
}

In any case that got me thinking about whether the compiler would actually produce different code for these two. My initial thought is they should be near identical, since src and dst are being incremented but never used I thought the compiler would know not to try to acually preserve them as "variables" in the produced machine code.

Using windows7 with VS 2010 C++ SP1 building in 32 bit Release mode (/O2), I got the dis-assembly code for both of the above incarnations. To prevent the function itself from referencing the input directly and being inlined i made a dll with each of the functions. I have omitted the prologue and epilogue of the produced ASM.

    while (*dst++ = *src++)
6EBB1003 8B 55 08             mov         edx,dword ptr [src]     
6EBB1006 8B 45 0C             mov         eax,dword ptr [dst]     
6EBB1009 2B D0                sub         edx,eax                //prepare edx so that edx + eax always points to src     
6EBB100B EB 03                jmp         docopy+10h (6EBB1010h)  
6EBB100D 8D 49 00             lea         ecx,[ecx]              //looks like align padding, never hit this line
6EBB1010 8A 0C 02             mov         cl,byte ptr [edx+eax]  //ptr [edx+ eax] points to char in src  :loop begin
6EBB1013 88 08                mov         byte ptr [eax],cl      //copy char to dst
6EBB1015 40                   inc         eax                    //inc src ptr
6EBB1016 84 C9                test        cl,cl                  // check for 0 (null terminator)
6EBB1018 75 F6                jne         docopy+10h (6EBB1010h)  //if not goto :loop begin
        ;

Above I have annotated the code, essentially a single loop , only 1 check for null and 1 memory copy.

Now lets look at my mistake version:

    while (*dst = *src)
6EBB1003 8B 55 08             mov         edx,dword ptr [src]  
6EBB1006 8A 0A                mov         cl,byte ptr [edx]  
6EBB1008 8B 45 0C             mov         eax,dword ptr [dst]  
6EBB100B 88 08                mov         byte ptr [eax],cl       //copy 0th char to dst
6EBB100D 84 C9                test        cl,cl                   //check for 0
6EBB100F 74 0D                je          docopy+1Eh (6EBB101Eh)  // return if we encounter null terminator
6EBB1011 2B D0                sub         edx,eax  
6EBB1013 8A 4C 02 01          mov         cl,byte ptr [edx+eax+1]  //get +1th char  :loop begin
    {
        src++;
        dst++;
6EBB1017 40                   inc         eax                   
6EBB1018 88 08                mov         byte ptr [eax],cl        //copy above char to dst
6EBB101A 84 C9                test        cl,cl                    //check for 0
6EBB101C 75 F5                jne         docopy+13h (6EBB1013h)   // if not goto :loop begin
    }

In my version, I see that it first copies the 0th char to the destination, then checks for null , and then finally enters the loop where it checks for null again. So the loop remains largely the same but now it handles the 0th character before the loop. This of course is going to be sub-optimal compared with the first case.

I am wondering if anyone knows why the compiler is being prevented from making the same (or near same) code as the first example. Is this a ms compiler specific issue or possibly with my compiler/linker settings?


here is the full code, 2 files (1 function replaces the other).

// in first dll project
__declspec(dllexport) void docopy(const char* src, char* dst)
{
    while (*dst++ = *src++);
}

__declspec(dllexport) void docopy(const char* src, char* dst)
{
    while (*dst = *src)
    {
        ++src;
        ++dst;
    }
}


//seprate main.cpp file calls docopy
void docopy(const char* src, char* dst);
char* source ="source";
char destination[100];
int main()
{

    docopy(source, destination);
}
share|improve this question
    
Would you please post the entire pieces of C code that you started with? It may be different because of the declarations of src & dst, but I would not be able to know. Are the assembler preambles that you removed identical? No need to paste them if they are. – gbulmer Mar 23 '12 at 17:51
    
In both cases that is the entire code, except for epilogue and prologue . The declaration of both functions is __declspec(dllexport) void docopy(char* src, char* dst) – skimon Mar 23 '12 at 17:57
    
This is bad coding coding style, because many readers will see the '=' within the expression as a typo for "==". – Thomas Matthews Mar 23 '12 at 18:15
    
@ThomasMatthews It is the implementation of strcpy() given in K&R. Have you heard of it? In any case, the OP makes it clear it's not his line of code. – Pascal Cuoq Mar 23 '12 at 19:16
    
@Pascal Cuoq: I know that pattern. Just because it is in K&R doesn't mean that it is good style. Take a look at the International Obfuscated C Code Contest winners, ioccc.org. Also, some of K&R's styles save printing money. – Thomas Matthews Mar 23 '12 at 20:11
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Because in the first example, the post-increment happens always, even if src starts out pointing to a null character. In the same starting situation, the second example would not increment the pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I see what you mean and im inclined to accept your answer. Shouldn't the compiler be able to see that dst and src being incremented makes no difference here since they are not used except in the context of the copy and comparison in while and essentially make the logic the same as the first example? – skimon Mar 23 '12 at 18:03
    
Theoretically, if src and dst are local, and not used again after the loop, then yes, the optimizer could make the assumption. Perhaps a more agressive optimizer would do that. On the other hand, the optimizer doesn't have the 'other' version to compare to. Given the second source, there is really nothing to hint that it could add an "extra" increment for efficiency. – AShelly Mar 23 '12 at 18:09
    
i have posted the full code in my original message. @AShelly i think you are right , perhaps the compiler is over cautious for some reason here. – skimon Mar 23 '12 at 18:11

Of course the compiler has other options. The "copy first byte then enter the loop if not 0" is what gcc-4.5.1 produces with -O1. With -O2 and -O3, it produces

.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    jmp     .L6             // jump to copy
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L4:
    addq    $1, %rdi        // increment pointers
    addq    $1, %rsi
.L6:                        // copy
    movzbl  (%rdi), %eax    // get source byte
    testb   %al, %al        // check for 0
    movb    %al, (%rsi)     // move to dest
    jne     .L4             // loop if nonzero
    rep
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

which is quite similar to what it produces for the K&R loop. Whether that's actually better I can't say, but it looks nicer.

Apart from the jump into the loop, the instructions for the K&R loop are exactly the same, just ordered differently:

.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L2:
    movzbl  (%rdi), %eax    // get source byte
    addq    $1, %rdi        // increment source pointer
    movb    %al, (%rsi)     // move byte to dest
    addq    $1, %rsi        // increment dest pointer
    testb   %al, %al        // check for 0
    jne     .L2             // loop if nonzero
    rep
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, if I compile in 64bit on gcc-4.4.4 I see the same behavior as you described. However in 32bit (-m32 -O3) it produces the "copy first byte then enter the loop if not 0". Possibly the availability of more registers in 64bit makes a difference here? – skimon Mar 23 '12 at 19:42
    
Good call. Indeed, with -m32, 4.5.1 also copies the first byte outside the loop - and it uses %eax as an offset, movzbl 1(%ecx,%eax), %edx; movb %dl, 1(%ebx,%eax); addl 1, %eax instead of incrementing the pointers directly as in 64-bit mode. Can you check what code the VS compiler produces for 64-bits? If that behaves similarly, it's very likely an architecture thing. – Daniel Fischer Mar 23 '12 at 20:00
    
just checked with 64bit on VS it still does the "copy first byte then enter the loop if not 0". – skimon Mar 23 '12 at 21:51

Your second code doesn't "check for null again". In your second version the cycle body works with the characters at edx+eax+1 address (note the +1 part), which would be characters number 1, 2, 3 and so on. The prologue code works with character number 0. That means that the code never checks the same character twice, as you seem to believe. There's no "again" there.

The second code is a bot more convoluted (the first iteration of the cycle is effectively pulled out of it) since, as it has already been explained, its functionality is different. The final values of the pointers differ between your fist and your second version.

share|improve this answer

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