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I am new to DVCS, but I have finally managed to figure out how it works, I would first like to check if the above steps in my workflow are the logical ones:

Steps: locally do: hg init, add and modify files, hg add ., hg commit hg push path_to_my_ repo; then go on remote server and do hg init, hg clone path_to_my_ repo and hg update.

(clone directly in dev.domain.com as the repo content extracts in a directory, is this OK?!)

Problem: I do get my files on the remote server, they are all there, but I can't edit any of them through my FTP/SFTP client? I can't edit anything in these added folders so it must be a permissions issue.

I have tried ls -al proj1/:

drwxr-xr-x  3 root  root    4096 Mar 23 15:26 ./
drwxr-x--- 18 moove nobody  4096 Mar 23 15:26 ../
drwxr-xr-x  3 root  root    4096 Mar 23 15:26 .hg/
-rw-r--r--  1 root  root   40272 Mar 23 15:26 wp-app.php

And chown root:root proj1 but this didn't resolve the problem.

Any advices please?

share|improve this question
    
are you logging in as root? all files in the current folder are owned by root... –  Chris Drappier Mar 23 '12 at 18:41
    
Erm, no. I have a cPanel install and couldn't figure out a way to create a FTP account (pureftpd) without creating a cPanel account, which will give the account owner access to just his directory anyway and this wouldn't make sense; ftp-ing with the root password doesn't work. Your question made me realise whats wrong, so how can I change the group/user of that particular folder then? –  C D Mar 23 '12 at 21:47
    
Please let us know whether you're using http: or ssh: URLs to push to the "remote server". It makes all the difference. –  Ry4an Mar 24 '12 at 0:42
    
Hey @Ry4an, I've only used the http version. –  C D Mar 26 '12 at 11:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your example workflow is not correct.
By "remote server", you mean a central server for your repositories where everybody can push to / pull from, correct?

If yes, then this part is not necessary:

then go on remote server and do hg init, hg clone path_to_my_ repo and hg update

You're supposed to set up the central repository on the server ONCE at the beginning (which probably includes hg init to create it, but not the rest).
--> then everybody can just push to and pull from it, and that's it. You don't have to do anything on the server after that (like editing files via FTP, like you tried) and certainly not hg update after every push!
(hg update creates a working directory in the repository on the server, which you don't need if you only want to push and pull from that repository)

Setting up the server also includes permissions (not necessarily file permissions on the server - more like, who has push/pull permissions on a certain repository).

For an overview about the different possible ways how to set up a Mercurial server, see Publishing Repositories in the Mercurial wiki.
(I can't help you directly with this - I use Mercurial daily, but I don't know how to set up a Mercurial server, let alone on Unix)


EDIT:

Honestly, I'm not sure if I understand your workflow.
Why the "ssh the server, clone the repo created" stuff? I don't understand why you want to clone your central repository again on the same server.

The usual basic workflow goes like this:
You work locally, write code and commit it to your local repository.
Somewhere, you have a central repository for your project (be it on Github/Bitbucket, or on your own server - that's what I meant when I said "central server"). After committing, you push to that and now your changes are in the central repository.
Your co-workers do the same, so you can pull from the central repository again to get the changes made by your co-workers as well (and they can pull as well to get your changes).

Then you said this:

We will pull (clone first time) the files on a subdomain (dev) first, every day before leaving, and when the project is finished, we will do the same thing on the server by cloning the repo on the live server

This is just to deploy your project, correct? I think I misunderstood that when I read your question for the first time.
So the cloning to the "dev" subdomain is not for the sake of having one more repository to push/pull, but just for deploying a test environment. Right?
If yes, that's okay. But in order to do this, you don't have to FTP/SSH on the server where the central repository is.
You can just create a new repository once on the dev server (hg init), and then regularly hg pull from the central repository and hg update to update the working copy on the dev server. This is all on the dev server, no need to do any of this on the server where the central repository is.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I wasn't explicit enough. I didn't mean a central server as I am a newbie and this would be too much for us (the other developers). The idea will be: the developer will start locally, push files to repo (git or bitbucket), then ssh the server, clone the repo created. We will pull (clone first time) the files on a subdomain (dev) first, every day before leaving, and when the project is finished, we will do the same thing on the server by cloning the repo on the live server, after we will create a cPanel account. Does it make sense? In this case, is my workflow making any sense at all? –  C D Mar 23 '12 at 21:58
    
your update makes sense, thank you. Yes, I/we will start locally, (hg init / hg add . / hg commit / hg push) and push to a central repository. Chances to work two or more persons on the same project are quite small now until we will fully understand how the system works and just having the central repository will be a good start to familiarise ourselves with. And then, yes, we will first deploy in a test environment (dev) (hg init / hg pull / hg update), continue to work locally, push to the central repo and when the work is done, init/pull/update on the live server. –  C D Mar 26 '12 at 8:42

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