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According to this response http://programmers.stackexchange.com/a/140780/39071: "Almost every class will have its own interface"

Is a good practice create a Interface for every class even when you see that will not make a difference at the moment?

Edit:

According to the comments: OK, the answer was given by the link in TDD context, but what's the problem, TDD Encourage good code, without TDD is need to maintain good code too. Are you telling me that the interfaces are created just for testing? It seems bad smell to me.

Edit 2:

And the term: "Programming to interfaces not implementation" is not a rule, right?

Edit 3:

I think the problem is in me. I always try to find an exact and universal way of doing things.

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closed as not constructive by Guvante, bernie, Tim Post Mar 25 '12 at 18:25

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too subjective for stack overflow. please read the faq about the types of questions to ask here : stackoverflow.com/faq –  Chris Drappier Mar 23 '12 at 18:44
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I think the response in that question are oriented towards Test Driven Development(TDD) not development in general –  Abe Miessler Mar 23 '12 at 18:45
    
That question is about A) Java, and B) testing, so the answer was in that context. Did you mean the same? –  Mr Lister Mar 23 '12 at 18:46
    
Pretty much any service should have an equivalent interface. Most other classes should not, unless there are concrete benefits to that interface. –  CodesInChaos Mar 23 '12 at 18:50
    
The issue here is that you're not asking about fact, but about general usage - "good practice" questions very quickly become questions about advice, rather than details. thus, not appropriate here. –  Ben Barden Mar 23 '12 at 18:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

YAGN - "You Ain't Gonna Need it"

In general, you shouldn't create something before you need it. The hard part is determining when you 'need' it.

good luck

EDIT: The answer you reference specifically states this is due to mocking. It may be from someone who takes the 'mockist' approach to TDD during which many mocks will be created. If you find someone who is a 'classical' TDDer, they create many fewer mocks and might disagree that due to TDD, almost all classes have interfaces.

See Fowler's article here that discusses Mockist vs Classical testing.

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I think the problem is in me. I always try to find an exact and universal way of doing things. I've read this article. –  Acaz Souza Mar 23 '12 at 19:04

I might not be using these terms properly so if you can cut me a little slack, but in my opinion you should only use interfaces when you are going to instantiating multiple classes (at least 2) with common methods that you will need. The main purpose of the interface is to ensure that the classes that implement the interface have the desired methods. So for example if you have three classes and they all have a walk method then having an interface is good because you know if you add another class that will have the walk method then it can implement the interface and that will ensure that the walk method is there. The other major advantage to the interface that I know of is that it allows you to instantiate each class as if it were one class.

So

public interface Movement
{
  string Crawl();
  string Walk();
  string Run();
}

public class Human : Movement
{
 public string Crawl()
 {
  return "Crawling";
 }
 public string Walk()
 {
  return "Walk and two feet";
 }
 public string Run()
 {
  return "Sprinting on two feet";
 }
}

public class Dog : Momevement
{
 public string Crawl()
 {
  return "Crawling";
 }
 public string Walk()
 {
  return "Walk and four feet";
 }
 public string Run()
 {
  return "Running on all fours";
 }
}

public void main()
{
 Movement move = new Human();
 move.Crawl();
}
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You need to create an interface when it's necessary to establish a contract about some specific behavior. There is no need to create interfaces where this contract is not required.

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There is no hard and fast rule on this.

Interfaces serve to define contracts that can be coded against without knowing the implementation type.

Some would argue that it's better to add them and code against them so that if you need to grow, you simply can drop in new implementations without having to make extensive code changes.

In my experience, the necessity for interfaces naturally reveals itself in a good design and if you're asking yourself, "Do I need an interface here?", chances are you don't.

As always, do what makes the most sense at the time for the application you are working on.

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That answer is specific to TDD and Java. Not C# or general programming.

Interface definitions should be used when you need to abstract the interface from the concrete class. (In the linked article it is for mocking purposes).

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Here you can read some general principles of programming:

The Principles of Good Programming - by Christopher Diggins

and one of the principles/guidlines is YAGNI (You Aren't Going to Need It) as already been answered by 'csturtz' and I add - KISS. (It's not related to TDD)

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