Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So I am using the filestream inside xmlreader

using (XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(new FileStream(archivePath, FileMode.Open), readerSettings))
{
    reader.close()
}

However, the file feed into the xmlreader still in the lock state after the using scope, weird, I thougt the xmlreader is going to close the filestream for me, is it not?

Thanks for help.

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Have you tried this?

using(var stream = new FileStream(archivePath, FileMode.Open))
using(var reader = XmlReader.Create(stream, readerSettings))
{

}

I couldn't find anything in the documentation that explicitly stated that the XmlReader would call dispose on the underlying stream when it was disposed. Also, I always use it as shown above and I have never encountered a problem.

Browsing through reflector I also find no instances where it calls Dispose() on the stream when creating a XmlTextReaderImpl. The XmlTextReaderImpl does not implement Dispose() and its Close() method looks like this:

internal void Close(bool closeInput)
{
    if (this.parsingFunction != ParsingFunction.ReaderClosed)
    {
        while (this.InEntity)
        {
            this.PopParsingState();
        }
        this.ps.Close(closeInput);
        this.curNode = NodeData.None;
        this.parsingFunction = ParsingFunction.ReaderClosed;
        this.reportedEncoding = null;
        this.reportedBaseUri = string.Empty;
        this.readState = ReadState.Closed;
        this.fullAttrCleanup = false;
        this.ResetAttributes();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
to be honest, no. I thought XmlReader is like StreamReader, will close the inner stream once done. use two using statement is just a bit clumsy. – TOMMY WANG Mar 23 '12 at 19:01
1  
Anecdotal, but most of the examples I see use the two using's. – Grant H. Mar 23 '12 at 19:04
1  
@TOMMYWANG: Well you may think so, but I cannot find anywhere in the code (using reflector) where XmlTextReaderImpl (which is what XmlReader.Create() actually returns) disposes of the stream. If it did close the stream you would run into problems when using one stream for multiple readers (what if I want to keep the stream alive? Why should the reader decide that I can't?), so it takes the safe approach of doing nothing. I don't agree that it is "clumsy', but 'clumsy' is better than 'broken'. – Ed S. Mar 23 '12 at 19:05
    
make sense, thanks! – TOMMY WANG Mar 23 '12 at 19:11
    
@TOMMYWANG: NP, glad to help :) – Ed S. Mar 23 '12 at 19:12

You should be able to control this through XmlReaderSettings.CloseInput.

readerSettings.CloseInput = true;
using (XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(new FileStream(archivePath, FileMode.Open), readerSettings))
{
    reader.close()
}

Or, more concisely if you don't care about other reader settings:

using (XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(new FileStream(archivePath, FileMode.Open), new XmlReaderSettings() { CloseInput = true }))
{
    // I believe this should be optional; using will close it.
    reader.close()
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Good answer, this stops FxCop from complaining about multiple disposals if you set CloseInput = false, which was annoying me. – briantyler Mar 16 '14 at 22:46

You would need to keep track of the FileStream and the XmlReader. It's potentially dangerous for the XmlReader to close the underlying stream. In the case where the FileStream is used by multiple readers: if one of these readers were to close the stream this would cause the other readers to fail unexpectedly.

It's a bit of a pain since some stream readers and writers will close the underlying stream, while others don't. As a best practice I always close and dispose of the streams I open manually. This also helps mitigate some 'gotchas' with certain streams.
e.g. You need to dispose a GZipStream before calling .ToArray()

share|improve this answer

A few years late but maybe this might help someone...

I tried Eric's method as it seemed like a good solution but I kept getting warning CA2202 when I ran VS code analysis on it.

Near the bottom of CA2202, Microsoft recommends to use the following:

(I slightly modified the it for "XmlReader".)

Stream stream = null;
try
{
    stream = new FileStream("file.txt", FileMode.Open);
    using (XmlReader reader = new XmlReader (stream))
    {
        stream = null;
        // Use the reader object...
    }
}
finally
{
    if(stream != null)
        stream.Dispose();
}

instead of...

using (Stream stream = new FileStream("file.txt", FileMode.Open))
{
    using (XmlReader reader = new XmlReader (stream))
    {
        // Use the reader object...
    }
}

It is much longer but at least it does not throw any warnings.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.