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I've got an app that has to do the following type of things, preferably on the GUI thread since that's where most of the action is taking place and there's no long-running ops:

Wait 1000
FuncA()
Wait 2000
FuncB()
Wait 1000
FuncC()

I realize I could use a timer with a state-machine style OnTick function, but that seems cumbersome:

    int _state;
    void OnTick(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        switch (_state) {
            case 0:
                FuncA();
                _timer.Interval = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2);
                _state = 1;
                break;
            case 1:
                FuncB();
                _timer.Interval = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1);
                _state = 2;
                break;
            case 2:
                FuncC();
                _timer.IsEnabled = false;
                _state = 0;
        }
    }

Plus I'd like to be able to make it generic enough to do something like

RunSequenceOnGuiThread(new Sequence {
    {1000, FuncA}
    {2000, FuncB}
    {1000, FuncC}};

Is there an idiomatic way to do this kind of thing? Given all the TPL stuff, or Rx, or even the computation expressions in F# I'd assume one exists, but I'm not finding it.

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What GUI library are you using? Winforms, WPF or something else? –  svick Mar 23 '12 at 19:58
    
WPF for now, but I'd like a solution (or at least a technique) that would work on WinForms as well. –  lobsterism Mar 23 '12 at 20:04
4  
Sidebar: One change I'd make - across all suggested solutions - is to use TimeSpan instead of integer for the delay. 1000 could mean one second, 1000 seconds, etc. TimeSpan is inherently clear and unambiguous. –  Joel P. Mar 23 '12 at 22:14
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a way to combine "yield return" and the reactive framework to give you a "poor man's async". Basically lets you "await" any IObservable. Here I just use it for timers since that's what you were interested in, but it you can have it "await" button clicks (using a Subject<Unit>) etc before moving on to the next thing as well.

public sealed partial class Form1 : Form {
    readonly Executor _executor = new Executor();

    public Form1() {
        InitializeComponent();
        _executor.Run(CreateAsyncHandler());
    }

    IEnumerable<IObservable<Unit>> CreateAsyncHandler() {
        while (true) {
            var i = 0;
            Text = (++i).ToString();
            yield return WaitTimer(500);
            Text = (++i).ToString();
            yield return WaitTimer(500);
            Text = (++i).ToString();
            yield return WaitTimer(500);
            Text = (++i).ToString();
        }
    }

    IObservable<Unit> WaitTimer(double ms) {
        return Observable.Timer(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(ms), new ControlScheduler(this)).Select(_ => Unit.Default);
    }

}

public sealed class Executor {
    IEnumerator<IObservable<Unit>> _observables;
    IDisposable _subscription = new NullDisposable();

    public void Run(IEnumerable<IObservable<Unit>> actions) {
        _observables = (actions ?? new IObservable<Unit>[0]).Concat(new[] {Observable.Never<Unit>()}).GetEnumerator();
        Continue();
    }

    void Continue() {
        _subscription.Dispose();
        _observables.MoveNext();
        _subscription = _observables.Current.Subscribe(_ => Continue());
    }

    public void Stop() {
        Run(null);
    }
}

sealed class NullDisposable : IDisposable {
    public void Dispose() {}
}

It's a slight modification of Daniel Earwicker's AsyncIOPipe idea: http://smellegantcode.wordpress.com/2008/12/05/asynchronous-sockets-with-yield-return-of-lambdas/

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Nice--I like that you can use control blocks in there too! –  lobsterism Apr 18 '12 at 18:19
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Observable.Concat(
        Observer.Timer(1000).Select(_ => Func1()),
        Observer.Timer(2000).Select(_ => Func2()),
        Observer.Timer(1000).Select(_ => Func3()))
    .Repeat()
    .Subscribe();

The only thing you have to do to make this work, is make sure that your Func's return a value (even if that value is Unit.Default, i.e. nothing)

Edit: Here's how to make a generic version:

IObservable<Unit> CreateRepeatingTimerSequence(IEnumerable<Tuple<int, Func<Unit>>> actions)
{
    return Observable.Concat(
        actions.Select(x => 
            Observable.Timer(x.Item1).Select(_ => x.Item2())))
        .Repeat();
}
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4  
Probably worth mentioning for the uninitiated that this is via Reactive Extensions –  Joel P. Mar 23 '12 at 22:07
3  
Wouldn't Do be a better operator than Select there? That way you wouldn't need to worry about the return value of the functions. –  Bryan Anderson Mar 23 '12 at 22:41
2  
@BryanAnderson Probably, but I feel gross every time I use Do :) –  Paul Betts Mar 23 '12 at 22:50
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Here's a sketch of this in F#:

let f() = printfn "f"
let g() = printfn "g"
let h() = printfn "h"

let ops = [
    1000, f
    2000, g
    1000, h
    ]

let runOps ops =
    async {
        for time, op in ops do
            do! Async.Sleep(time)
            op()
    } |> Async.StartImmediate 

runOps ops
System.Console.ReadKey() |> ignore

That's in a console app, but you can just call runOps on the GUI thread. See also this blog.

If you're using VS11/NetFx45/C#5, you can do a similar thing with C# async/await and a List of Tuple of Action delegates.

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using the async CTP or .NET 4.5 (C# 5) it's REALLY easy using an async method and the await operator. This can be called directly on the UI thread and it will work as expected.

    public async void ExecuteStuff()
    {
        await TaskEx.Delay(1000);
        FuncA();
        await TaskEx.Delay(2000);
        FuncB();
        await TaskEx.Delay(1000);
        FuncC();
    }
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1  
If you were using beta of .Net 4.5, that would be Task.Delay(). –  svick Mar 23 '12 at 20:00
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Interesting all the different responses. Here's a simple DIY option that doesn't depend on any other libraries, and doesn't hog thread resources unnecessarily.

Basically, for each action in your list, it creates an onTick function that executes that action, then recursively calls DoThings with the remaining actions and delays.

Here, ITimer is just a simple wrapper around DispatcherTimer (but it would work with a SWF Timer as well, or a mock timer for unit testing), and DelayedAction is just a Tuple with int Delay and Action action

public static class TimerEx {
    public static void DoThings(this ITimer timer, IEnumerable<DelayedAction> actions) {
        timer.DoThings(actions.GetEnumerator());
    }

    static void DoThings(this ITimer timer, IEnumerator<DelayedAction> actions) {
        if (!actions.MoveNext())
            return;
        var first = actions.Current;
        Action onTick = null;
        onTick = () => {
            timer.IsEnabled = false;
            first.Action();
            // ReSharper disable AccessToModifiedClosure
            timer.Tick -= onTick;
            // ReSharper restore AccessToModifiedClosure
            onTick = null;
            timer.DoThings(actions);
        };
        timer.Tick += onTick;
        timer.Interval = first.Delay;
        timer.IsEnabled = true;
    }
}

If you don't want to delve into F# or reference Rx or use .Net 4.5 this is a simple viable solution.

Here's an example of how to test it:

[TestClass]
public sealed class TimerExTest {
    [TestMethod]
    public void Delayed_actions_should_be_scheduled_correctly() {
        var timer = new MockTimer();
        var i = 0;
        var action = new DelayedAction(0, () => ++i);
        timer.DoThings(new[] {action, action});
        Assert.AreEqual(0, i);
        timer.OnTick();
        Assert.AreEqual(1, i);
        timer.OnTick();
        Assert.AreEqual(2, i);
        timer.OnTick();
        Assert.AreEqual(2, i);
    }
}

And here's the other classes to make it compile:

public interface ITimer {
    bool IsEnabled { set; }
    double Interval { set; }
    event Action Tick;
}

public sealed class Timer : ITimer {
    readonly DispatcherTimer _timer;

    public Timer() {
        _timer = new DispatcherTimer();
        _timer.Tick += (sender, e) => OnTick();
    }

    public double Interval {
        set { _timer.Interval = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(value); }
    }

    public event Action Tick;

    public bool IsEnabled {
        set { _timer.IsEnabled = value; }
    }

    void OnTick() {
        var handler = Tick;
        if (handler != null) {
            handler();
        }
    }
}

public sealed class MockTimer : ITimer {
    public event Action Tick;

    public bool IsEnabled { private get; set; }

    public double Interval { set { } }

    public void OnTick() {
        if (IsEnabled) {
            var handler = Tick;
            if (handler != null) {
                handler();
            }
        }
    }
}


public sealed class DelayedAction {
    readonly Action _action;
    readonly int _delay;

    public DelayedAction(int delay, Action action) {
        _delay = delay;
        _action = action;
    }

    public Action Action {
        get { return _action; }
    }

    public int Delay {
        get { return _delay; }
    }
}
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If you can use the C# 4.5 to do it, go with Firoso post: it's the best way accomplish that in C#, exactly what Async was built for.

However, if you can't, there might be some ways to do it. I'd do a "simple" manager to do it:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private TimedEventsManager _timedEventsManager;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _timedEventsManager 
            = new TimedEventsManager(this,
                new TimedEvent(1000, () => textBox1.Text += "First\n"),
                new TimedEvent(5000, () => textBox1.Text += "Second\n"),
                new TimedEvent(2000, () => textBox1.Text += "Third\n")
            );

    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _timedEventsManager.Start();
    }
}

public class TimedEvent
{
    public int Interval { get; set; }
    public Action Action { get; set; }

    public TimedEvent(int interval, Action func)
    {
        Interval = interval;
        Action = func;
    }
}

public class TimedEventsManager
{
    private readonly Control _control;
    private readonly Action _chain;

    public TimedEventsManager(Control control, params TimedEvent[] timedEvents)
    {
        _control = control;
        Action current = null;

        // Create a method chain, beginning by the last and attaching it 
        // the previous.
        for (var i = timedEvents.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            var i1 = i;
            var next = current;
            current = () =>
                          {
                              Thread.Sleep(timedEvents[i1].Interval);
                               // MUST run it on the UI thread!
                              _control.Invoke(new Action(() => timedEvents[i1].Action()));
                              if (next != null) next();
                          };
        }

        _chain = current;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        new Thread(new ThreadStart(_chain)).Start();
    }
}

Beware that this example is Winforms specific (uses Control.Invoke()). You will need a slightly different version for WPF, which uses the thread dispatcher to achieve the same thing. (if my memory doesn't fail me, you also can use Control.Dispatcher.Invoke(), but keep in mind that it is a different control)

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