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See edits below

There is no casting going on with the termination check. I would think the < and the ++ would be as fast with ints and longs on a 64bit machine. But I guess not?

int: 65 milliseconds:

public void testWTF() throws Exception {
    int runs = 10;
    long hs = 0;
    long timeSum = 0;
    for (int run = 0; run < runs; run++) {
        int term = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        // ***** loop to be tested ******
        for (int i = 0; i < term; i++) {
            hs++;
        }
        timeSum += (System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
        System.out.println("hs = " + hs);
        hs = 0;

    }
    System.out.println("timeSum = " + timeSum);
    System.out.println("avg time = " + (timeSum / runs) + " for " + runs + " runs");
    System.out.println("hs = " + hs);
}

long: 1445 milliseconds

public void testWTF() throws Exception {
    int runs = 10;
    long hs = 0;
    long timeSum = 0;
    for (int run = 0; run < runs; run++) {
        long term = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        // ***** loop to be tested ******
        for (long i = 0; i < term; i++) {
            hs++;
        }
        timeSum += (System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
        System.out.println("hs = " + hs);
        hs = 0;

    }
    System.out.println("timeSum = " + timeSum);
    System.out.println("avg time = " + (timeSum / runs) + " for " + runs + " runs");
    System.out.println("hs = " + hs);
}

hardware: 64-bit Xeon running windows 7 64bit.

edit: I updated this to do several iterations. For 1 million runs with the int version, the average time is 65 milliseconds. The long version takes too long for 1 million, 1000 and even 100. For 10 runs the average time is 1447 milliseconds.

Also, I'm using hs outside the loop so that the loop does not get jitted away.

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1  
Did you run this multiple times? If you just ran it once that could explain the huge time difference. –  Brendan Long Mar 23 '12 at 20:19
1  
I can not confirm your result. With the int version i the avg time is 1475ms and with the long version 1463ms for 10 runs. Running on Windows 8 64 Bit with JDK 7 update 13 64 Bit –  Henry Feb 12 '13 at 11:43
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1 Answer 1

This is a very bad/unreliable/unrealistic way of doing benchmarks, since the JIT isn't really given a chance to do much optimization -- you only run the benchmarks once, and you measure the first run.

Basically, Java's JIT will optimize your code significantly more once it sees your code getting used extensively. In a real program, the JIT will be optimizing any critical loops, so if you want a benchmark that mimics the real world, you have to convince the JIT to kick in.

The simplest way to get an accurate benchmark in Java is to use a tool like Caliper that knows how to properly warm up the JIT and get accurate measurements, and then see if the results are more consistent.

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see my edits above. –  marathon Mar 23 '12 at 20:40
    
It looks like the JIT is smart enough to eliminate the loop completely for int, probably just replacing the whole loop with the assignment hs = term. The bytecode is more complicated for long, probably indicating the JIT isn't smart enough to do it in that case. Either way, it's not exactly a realistic benchmark. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 23 '12 at 21:32
    
I modified it a bit so that hs has to be used outside the loop. That gives about 65ms for the int. –  marathon Mar 23 '12 at 21:43
    
It can sometimes take 10000 runs of a benchmark for the JIT to kick in. Bring term down to something more reasonable and try the comparison with running both benchmarks a huge number of times. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 23 '12 at 21:53
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