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Sorry for bumpy topic name (feel free to edit if you find more fitting title after looking at problem). Code sample equals 1000 words, so here we go:

if [ "$REGEX" != "" ]; then
        find $TEST_DIR -type f -regextype posix-extended -regex '^.*(status|stderr|stdout)-captured$' |                                  
        grep -E $REGEX |
        awk '{print(""$1" "$1)}' | sed 's/-captured$/-expected/' | 
        while read -r line; do mv -f $line; done 
else
        find $TEST_DIR -type f -regextype posix-extended -regex '^.*(status|stderr|stdout)-captured$' |
        awk '{print(""$1" "$1)}' | sed 's/-captured$/-expected/' |
        while read -r line; do mv -f $line; done
fi

What code does is not all that important, I'd just like to find more elegant way to either use "grep -E $REGEX" or not. I thought that conditdonal aliases could do the job just like I'm used to from shell usage, but they does not work inside scripts.

I could put in a condition, but I fear performance impact from multiple evaluations.

Any way to make the code "more elegant"?

share|improve this question
    
Can you describe the input/output you're looking for a little bit better? –  Carl Norum Mar 23 '12 at 20:30
    
@CarlNorum Don't think it's necessary, but I shall: first find prints path to files matching name {status,stderr,stdout)-captured, then these are further filtered by grep -E $REGEX. Awk, sed and read, assemble this example: ./dir/status-captured into mv ./dir/status-captured ./dir/status-expected that is executed. –  AoeAoe Mar 23 '12 at 20:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One simple way is to use ^ (which always matches: it means "start-of-line", which every line has) if $REGEX is unset or blank:

find $TEST_DIR -type f -regextype posix-extended -regex '^.*(status|stderr|stdout)-captured$' |
grep -E ${REGEX:-^} |
awk '{print(""$1" "$1)}' | sed 's/-captured$/-expected/' |
while read -r line; do mv -f $line; done

For that matter, you can combine it into the original find:

find $TEST_DIR -type f -regextype posix-extended \
     -regex '^.*(status|stderr|stdout)-captured$' \
     -regex ".*${REGEX}.*" |
awk '{print(""$1" "$1)}' | sed 's/-captured$/-expected/' |
while read -r line; do mv -f $line; done

and for that matter, you can merge all of the rest of your script into find as well:

find $TEST_DIR -type f -regextype posix-extended \
     -regex '^.*(status|stderr|stdout)-captured$' \
     -regex ".*${REGEX}.*" \
     -exec bash -c 'file="{}" ; mv -f "$file" "${file%-captured}-expected"' \;
share|improve this answer
    
Interestingly, first variant performs best in my test tree. Thank you for really interesting answers. –  AoeAoe Mar 23 '12 at 21:02
    
@AoeAoe: You're welcome! –  ruakh Mar 23 '12 at 21:06

A very simple solution is:

test -n "$REGEX" && cmd="grep -E $REGEX"
find ... | ${cmd-cat} | awk ...

If cmd is defined, it is used in the pipe. Otherwise, cat is used, performing a no-op. You can also do:

find ... |
if test -n "$REGEX"; then
  grep -E $REGEX
else
  cat
fi |
awk ...

with exactly the same effect.

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Here's a slightly ugly, but general, solution.

find $TEST_DIR -type f -regextype posix-extended -regex '^.*(status|stderr|stdout)-captured$' \
 | if [ "$REGEX" != "" ]; then
        grep -E $REGEX; \
   else \
        cat; \
   fi \
 | awk '{print(""$1" "$1)}' \
 | sed 's/-captured$/-expected/' \
 | while read -r line; do mv -f $line; done 
share|improve this answer

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