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I have a method getNewA() that is supposed to block until some other thread calls setA(x). Is it correct to use a CountDownLatch? I noticed that there is a data race in that there is a possibility that after gate.await() unblocks another thread will call setA(x) using the old latch, therefore it might be possible to miss a value. I thought about synchronizing getNewA() but wouldn't that result in a deadlock? Any suggestions on how to approach this?

package test;

import java.util.concurrent.CountDownLatch;

public class A {

    private int a;
    private CountDownLatch gate;

    public A(int a) {
        a = 1;
        gate = new CountDownLatch(1);
    }

    A getNewA() throws InterruptedException {  // wait for new a...
        gate.await();

        gate = new CountDownLatch(1);
        return this;
    }

    public synchronized int getA() {
        return a;
    }

    public synchronized void setA(int a) {      
        gate.countDown();
        this.a = a;
    }
}
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If another thread calls setA before getNewA(), what's that meant to do? Might a semaphore be more useful for you? –  Jon Skeet Mar 23 '12 at 20:51
    
If setA is before getNewA(). A thread that calls getNewA() will return the instance without blocking –  xxtommoxx Mar 23 '12 at 20:55
    
And if setA() is called twice before getNewA() is called, what happens then? Can two calls to getNewA() pass without blocking? If two threads are both waiting on getNewA() and a single setA() call comes in, should both be unblocked or just one? You really need to describe your situation carefully :) –  Jon Skeet Mar 23 '12 at 21:01
    
Should getNewA really return A, not int? –  Tom Anderson Mar 23 '12 at 22:30
    
The current code has a race condition: if two threads call getNewA() and block, then another thread wakes them up, then a fourth thread immediately calls getNewA(), it is possible that the fourth thread will see a value of gate that is set by the first thread to leave the gate, but which is then overwritten by the second thread to leave the gate before any setA()-calling thread has a chance to see it. That poor fourth thread will never be unblocked. –  Tom Anderson Mar 23 '12 at 22:35
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3 Answers

Use a Phaser. You can reuse it just like you want here without having to create a new instance of the your barrier.

public class A {

    private int a
    private final Phaser phaser = new Phaser(1);


    public A(int a) {
        a = 1;
    }


    A getNewA() throws InterruptedException {  // wait for new a...
        phaser.awaitAdvance(phaser.getPhase());
        return this;
    }

    public synchronized  int getA() {
        return percent;
    }

    public synchronized void setA(int a) {      
        this.a = a
        phaser.arrive();
    }
}

Each time setA is called it will increment to a new phase and the phaser.awaitAdvance(phaser.getPhase()) will return out. At this point the new phase will equal the phaser.getPhase()+1

Note: this requires Java 7.

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Any alternatives if im using java 6? –  xxtommoxx Mar 23 '12 at 21:16
    
Wouldn't a SynchronousQueue work as well? –  lhballoti Mar 23 '12 at 21:56
    
@xxtommoxx I thought of some usages with FutureTask but don't like it enough to post it. I may be able to work it better. –  John Vint Mar 23 '12 at 22:04
    
@lhballoti Unfortunately not. A SynchronousQueue requires the putting thread to wait until there is a pulling thread. This requirement is for a thread to simply signal and continue working. If there is no thread waiting for a signal then that's ok. –  John Vint Mar 23 '12 at 22:05
    
@JohnVint indeed, it didn't occur to me that the putting thread would block. –  lhballoti Mar 23 '12 at 22:11
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An alternative is to handle synchronization yourself. What I think you want is for the getA to return a value that is set after a thread currently enters. You can use this as the wait() criteria.

public class A {

    private int a;
    private long updateCount = 0;

    private final Object lock = new Object();

    public A getNewA() throws InterruptedException {  // wait for new a...
        synchronized(lock) {
           long currentCount = updateCount ;
           while (currentCount == updateCont) {//assumes never decrementing
              lock.wait();
           }
           return this;
        }
    }

    public int getA() {
        synchronized(lock) {
             return a;
        }
    }

    public void setA(int a) {      
        synchronized(lock) {
             this.a = a;
             updateCount++;
             lock.notifyAll();
        }
    }
}

Edit: Race condition is possible as TomAnderson mentioned. Thanks

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1  
The use of timestamps like that is vulnerable to race conditions if you get more than one update in the same millisecond - and a millisecond is a long time in computing. You would be better off using a counter than a timestamp. –  Tom Anderson Mar 23 '12 at 22:30
    
@TomAnderson That's a fair point I'll switch to AtomicLong –  John Vint Mar 23 '12 at 22:34
2  
It doesn't need to be atomic; all the accesses are protected by the synchronization on lock. –  Tom Anderson Mar 23 '12 at 22:36
    
@TomAnderson man you're on a roll, updated again, Thanks! –  John Vint Mar 23 '12 at 22:38
    
Think of it as an unusual kind of pair programming! –  Tom Anderson Mar 23 '12 at 22:45
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You could use a Semahore:

package test;

import java.util.concurrent.Semaphore;

public class A {

    private int a
    private Semaphore semaphore = new Semaphore(0);


    public A(int a) {
        a = 1;            
    }


    A getNewA() throws InterruptedException {  // wait for new a...
        semaphore.acquire();
        return this;
    }

    public synchronized int getA() {
        return percent;
    }

    public synchronized void setA(int a) {                  
        this.a = a;
        semaphore.release();
    }
}

If the semaphore has 0 permits left and two threads call getA one after the other, both will block and only of them will be non-deterministically chosen to wake up when setA is called.

If setA is called twice in a sequence, it will allow two threads to call getA next time, which may not be what you want, since both of them will get the same reference to this.

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