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I am trying to write a function that returns the index of the passed value v in a given list x; -1 if not found. My attempt at the solution:

let rec index (x, v) =
    let i = 0 in
        match x with
        [] -> -1
        | (curr::rest) -> if(curr == v) then
                            i
                          else
                            succ i; (* i++ *)
                            index(rest, v)
;;

This is obviously wrong to me (it will return -1 every time) because it redefines i at each pass. I have some obscure ways of doing it with separate functions in my head, none which I can write down at the moment. I know this is a common pattern in all programming, so my question is, what's the best way to do this in OCaml?

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BTW, I would suggest that you use option types (instead of special values) to make the "not found" case more type safe. In Haskell we have Maybe but I don't know the name of the Ocaml equivalent for it. –  missingno Mar 23 '12 at 21:37
    
As missingno wrote: Do not use the '-1' return value -- use the incredible type system instead of obscuring this error as an unused integer: Rather write: "match x with | [] -> None | ... if ... then (Some i) else ..." were the "else" case is the Not-found one. –  lambdapower Mar 30 '12 at 14:37
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't mutate variables in OCaml (well, there is a way but you really shouldn't for simple things like this)

A basic trick you can do is create a helper function that receives extra arguments corresponding to the variables you want to "mutate". Note how I added an extra parameter for the i and also "mutate" the current list head in a similar way.

let rec index_helper (x, vs, i) =
    match vs with
      [] -> -1
      | (curr::rest) ->
          if(curr == x) then
              i
          else
              index_helper (x, rest, i+1)
;;

let index (x, vs) = index_helper (x, vs, 0) ;;

This kind of tail-recursive transformation is a way to translate loops to functional programming but to be honest it is kind of low level (you have full power but the manual recursion looks like programming with gotos...).

For some particular patterns what you can instead try to do is take advantage of reusable higher order functions, such as map or folds.

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Yes this is what I ended up doing, but I was wondering if there was a neater syntax with just an inner function as well? –  id2341677 Mar 23 '12 at 21:36
    
As is often the case, there's a version that's a little tidier if you don't require tail recursion. You don't need the helper function in that case. –  Jeffrey Scofield Mar 23 '12 at 21:41
    
Just a small remark over the equality used for the comparison: == is physical equality, which might not be what you want for e.g. a string list: index("foo", ["foo"]) returns -1. You might prefer structural equality (=, even though it is not problem free either). –  Virgile Sep 21 '12 at 14:59
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Mutation is not a common way to solve problems in OCaml. For this task, you should use recursion and accumulate results by changing the index i on certain conditions:

let index(x, v) =
    let rec loop x i =
        match x with
        | [] -> -1
        | h::t when h = v -> i
        | _::t -> loop t (i+1)
    in loop x 0

Another thing is that using -1 as an exceptional case is not a good idea. You may forget this assumption somewhere and treat it as other indices. In OCaml, it's better to treat this exception using option type so the compiler forces you to take care of None every time:

let index(x, v) =
    let rec loop x i =
        match x with
        | [] -> None
        | h::t when h = v -> Some i
        | _::t -> loop t (i+1)
    in loop x 0
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I was not aware of the option type. Duly noted. Thank you. –  id2341677 Mar 23 '12 at 21:45
    
Why mutation should be considered as bad practice ? I do not agree on this. –  Thomas Mar 23 '12 at 21:56
    
@Thomas: I would say mutation is not natural for this kind of tasks. Going to update my answer. –  pad Mar 23 '12 at 21:58
    
@Thomas Mutable variables make programs harder to understand and often introduce trigger bombs (latent bugs that only show up when you use the code in a slightly different way that causes a mutable variable to be mutated in one place while some other part of the code expects to have its own value). It's often also slower, because the compiler is less able to optimize. –  Gilles Mar 24 '12 at 18:36
1  
From my experience, mutation is not a problem when used locally (ie. inside a function body and mutable cells are not exported outside the function). Moreover, it really depends on the underlying data-structure you are using: using recursion on an array instead of a for-loop doesn't make any sense to me. –  Thomas Mar 24 '12 at 22:47
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This is pretty clearly a homework problem, so I'll just make two comments.

First, values like i are immutable in OCaml. Their values don't change. So succ i doesn't do what your comment says. It doesn't change the value of i. It just returns a value that's one bigger than i. It's equivalent to i + 1, not to i++.

Second the essence of recursion is to imagine how you would solve the problem if you already had a function that solves the problem! The only trick is that you're only allowed to pass this other function a smaller version of the problem. In your case, a smaller version of the problem is one where the list is shorter.

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Yeah I assumed succ i; was wrong. I'm new to OCaml and just sort of threw it in there. Thanks. –  id2341677 Mar 23 '12 at 21:35
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