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Is there a way in the new async dotnet 4.5 library to set a timeout on the Task.WhenAll method. I want to fetch several sources and stop after say 5 seconds and skip the sources that weren't finished.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You could combine the resulting Task with a Task.Delay() using Task.WhenAny():

await Task.WhenAny(Task.WhenAll(tasks), Task.Delay(timeout));

If you want to harvest completed tasks in case of a timeout:

var completedResults =
  tasks
  .Where(t => t.Status == TaskStatus.RanToCompletion)
  .Select(t => t.Result)
  .ToList();
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This has the most upvotes, but do we know if this is now a valid approach for accomplishing this? –  CitadelCSAlum Jul 13 '13 at 18:21
2  
@CitadelCSAlum What do you mean? This code does what is being asked. If you don't believe me, you can read the documentation or try it yourself. –  svick Jul 16 '13 at 1:24
    
Although this is the accepted answer, does it do exactly what was described in the question? If I understand correctly, if the timeout occurs before all the tasks are completed, then no result is received (even if some of the tasks were completed). Am I correct? I was looking for something that will allow extracting results from several tasks - taking only those that beat the timeout, regardless if the rest of tasks failed to do so. See my answer below. –  Erez Cohen Aug 31 at 20:12
1  
@ErezCohen You're right. I guess I answered mostly the title of the question and not the body (especially the "skip the sources that weren't finished" part). –  svick Aug 31 at 20:20

Check out the "Early Bailout" and "Task.Delay" sections from Microsoft's Task-Based Asynchronous Pattern Overview.

  • Early bailout. An operation represented by t1 can be grouped in a WhenAny with another task t2, and we can wait on the WhenAny task. t2 could represent a timeout, or cancellation, or some other signal that will cause the WhenAny task to complete prior to t1 completing.
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Do you want to add a summary of what it says? –  svick Nov 4 '12 at 0:06
    
Not sure why you came back to this post but your code sample is exactly what the paper describes (as I assume you are well aware). At your request, I've updated my answer with the verbatim quote. –  David Peden Nov 5 '12 at 2:35
    
gg random, no-commenting down-voter on a 2.5 year old post. awesome. –  David Peden Sep 9 at 21:54

What you describe seems like a very common demand however I could not find anywhere an example of this. And I searched a lot... I finally created the following:

TimeSpan timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5.0);

Task<Task>[] tasksOfTasks =
{
    Task.WhenAny(SomeTaskAsync("a"), Task.Delay(timeout)),
    Task.WhenAny(SomeTaskAsync("b"), Task.Delay(timeout)),
    Task.WhenAny(SomeTaskAsync("c"), Task.Delay(timeout))
};

Task[] completedTasks = await Task.WhenAll(tasksOfTasks);

List<MyResult> = completedTasks.OfType<Task<MyResult>>().Select(task => task.Result).ToList();

I assume here a method SomeTaskAsync that returns Task<MyResult>.

From the members of completedTasks, only tasks of type MyResult are our own tasks that managed to beat the clock. Task.Delay returns a different type. This requires some compromise on typing, but still works beautifully and quite simple.

(The array can of course be built dynamically using a query + ToArray).

  • Note that this implementation does not require SomeTaskAsync to receive a cancellation token.
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This looks like something that should be encapsulated into a helper method. –  svick Aug 31 at 20:19
    
I realized that this implementation caused some issue. see stackoverflow.com/q/25715335/145599. I'll edit if I come to a better answer –  Erez Cohen Sep 7 at 22:28
    
@ErezCohen I've made my answer even simpler, if you want to take a look: stackoverflow.com/a/25733275/885318 –  I3arnon Sep 9 at 19:49
1  
@I3arnon - Nice!. I like it. –  Erez Cohen Sep 11 at 8:55
    
Regarding my comment above - seems like there are no issues with the solution I've given here. It works well. (The issues I encountered originated from elsewhere in my code). –  Erez Cohen Sep 11 at 8:56

I think a clearer, more robust option that also does exception handling right would be to use Task.WhenAny on each task together with a timeout task, go through all the completed tasks and filter out the timeout ones, and use await Task.WhenAll() instead of Task.Result to gather all the results.

Here's a complete working solution:

static async Task<TResult[]> WhenAll<TResult>(IEnumerable<Task<TResult>> tasks, TimeSpan timeout)
{
    var timeoutTask = Task.Delay(timeout).ContinueWith(_ => default(TResult));
    var completedTasks = 
        (await Task.WhenAll(tasks.Select(task => Task.WhenAny(task, timeoutTask)))).
        Where(task => task != timeoutTask);
    return await Task.WhenAll(completedTasks);
}
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I came to the following piece of code that does what I needed:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Json;
using System.Threading;

namespace MyAsync
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
            Console.WriteLine("Start Main");
            List<Task<List<MyObject>>> listoftasks = new List<Task<List<MyObject>>>();
            listoftasks.Add(GetGoogle(cts));
            listoftasks.Add(GetTwitter(cts));
            listoftasks.Add(GetSleep(cts));
            listoftasks.Add(GetxSleep(cts));

            List<MyObject>[] arrayofanswers = Task.WhenAll(listoftasks).Result;
            List<MyObject> answer = new List<MyObject>();
            foreach (List<MyObject> answers in arrayofanswers)
            {
                answer.AddRange(answers);
            }
            foreach (MyObject o in answer)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", o.name, o.origin);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Press <Enter>");
            Console.ReadLine();
        } 

        static async Task<List<MyObject>> GetGoogle(CancellationTokenSource cts) 
        {
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Start GetGoogle");
                List<MyObject> l = new List<MyObject>();
                var client = new HttpClient();
                Task<HttpResponseMessage> awaitable = client.GetAsync("http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q=broersa", cts.Token);
                HttpResponseMessage res = await awaitable;
                Console.WriteLine("After GetGoogle GetAsync");
                dynamic data = JsonValue.Parse(res.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);
                Console.WriteLine("After GetGoogle ReadAsStringAsync");
                foreach (var r in data.responseData.results)
                {
                    l.Add(new MyObject() { name = r.titleNoFormatting, origin = "google" });
                }
                return l;
            }
            catch (TaskCanceledException)
            {
                return new List<MyObject>();
            }
        }

        static async Task<List<MyObject>> GetTwitter(CancellationTokenSource cts)
        {
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Start GetTwitter");
                List<MyObject> l = new List<MyObject>();
                var client = new HttpClient();
                Task<HttpResponseMessage> awaitable = client.GetAsync("http://search.twitter.com/search.json?q=broersa&rpp=5&include_entities=true&result_type=mixed",cts.Token);
                HttpResponseMessage res = await awaitable;
                Console.WriteLine("After GetTwitter GetAsync");
                dynamic data = JsonValue.Parse(res.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);
                Console.WriteLine("After GetTwitter ReadAsStringAsync");
                foreach (var r in data.results)
                {
                    l.Add(new MyObject() { name = r.text, origin = "twitter" });
                }
                return l;
            }
            catch (TaskCanceledException)
            {
                return new List<MyObject>();
            }
        }

        static async Task<List<MyObject>> GetSleep(CancellationTokenSource cts)
        {
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Start GetSleep");
                List<MyObject> l = new List<MyObject>();
                await Task.Delay(5000,cts.Token);
                l.Add(new MyObject() { name = "Slept well", origin = "sleep" });
                return l;
            }
            catch (TaskCanceledException)
            {
                return new List<MyObject>();
            }

        } 

        static async Task<List<MyObject>> GetxSleep(CancellationTokenSource cts)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Start GetxSleep");
            List<MyObject> l = new List<MyObject>();
            await Task.Delay(2000);
            cts.Cancel();
            l.Add(new MyObject() { name = "Slept short", origin = "xsleep" });
            return l;
        } 

    }
}

My explanation is in my blogpost: http://blog.bekijkhet.com/2012/03/c-async-examples-whenall-whenany.html

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In addition to svick's answer, the following works for me when I have to wait for a couple of tasks to complete but have to process something else while I'm waiting:

Task[] TasksToWaitFor = //Your tasks
TimeSpan Timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds( 30 );

while( true )
{
    await Task.WhenAny( Task.WhenAll( TasksToWaitFor ), Task.Delay( Timeout ) );
    if( TasksToWaitFor.All( a => a.IsCompleted ) )
        break;

    //Do something else here
}
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Seems like the Task.WaitAll overload with the timeout parameter is all you need - if it returns true, then you know they all completed - otherwise, you can filter on IsCompleted.

if (Task.WaitAll(tasks, myTimeout) == false)
{
    tasks = tasks.Where(t => t.IsCompleted);
}
...
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I think these tasks are all started in there own threads and the new async functions are not, but correct me if I'm wrong. I'm just starting this new async stuff. –  broersa Mar 25 '12 at 9:39
3  
Task.WaitAll() is blocking, so it's not a good idea to use it in C# 5, if you can avoid it. –  svick Mar 25 '12 at 12:31
    
@broersa First, I think you got that wrong, the relation between threads and Tasks or async methods is not that simple. Second, why would that matter? –  svick Mar 25 '12 at 12:33
    
@svick Blocking is the word I sought. Things are getting clear now. –  broersa Mar 26 '12 at 7:34

Check out a custom task combinator proposed in http://tutorials.csharp-online.net/Task_Combinators

async static Task<TResult> WithTimeout<TResult> 
   (this Task<TResult> task, TimeSpan timeout)
 {
   Task winner = await (Task.WhenAny 
      (task, Task.Delay (timeout)));
   if (winner != task) throw new TimeoutException();
   return await task; // Unwrap result/re-throw
}

I have not tried it yet.

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a) The link is broken. b) This works for a single task, which isn't what the OP asked about. –  I3arnon Sep 8 at 22:27

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