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I created a WCF service and to the default service I added another operation contract on the main DataContract:

[OperationContract]
void DoSomething(UserData data);

Then I have something like this (simplified for the purpose of example) below. The problem is that even though ALL classes in the hierarchy are decorated with DataContract and ALL their members decorated with DataMember, when I use the WCF Test Client it has a red icon indicating that "the operation is not supported in the WCF test client".

[DataContract]
public class UserData {
   [DataMember]
   public uint One { get; set; }

   [DataMember]
   public CompositeType Extra { get; set; }

   public UserData() { ctor. code }
}


[DataContract]
public class CompositeType {
    [DataMember]
    public uint Two { get; set; }

    public UserData() { ctor code }
}
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1  
I see two classes with the same name but one is missing the composite type, what do you mean by it? You also forgot to post the class of the composite type. –  Silvermind Mar 23 '12 at 21:45
    
I see you are talking about hierarchy. Are you implementing any kind of recursive relationship? Since that would require the class being used recursively to be decorated with [DataContract(IsReference=True)] –  Silvermind Mar 23 '12 at 23:27
    
@Silvermind sorry typo error, the 2nd (already corrected) was CompositeType and not UserData. I also added the IsReference parameter to the subtypes used in the main DataContract but that did not resolve the problem. –  Lord of Scripts Mar 26 '12 at 1:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add the attribute to your 'UserData' class [KnownType(typeof(CompositeType))]

Like:

[DataContract]
[KnownType(typeof(CompositeType))]
public class UserData 
{
   [DataMember]
   public uint One { get; set; }

   [DataMember]
   public CompositeType Extra { get; set; }

   public UserData() { ctor. code }
}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms730167.aspx

Edit:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.operatingsystem.aspx

The OperatingSystem class has a few properties which relate to other classes. You could include all these classes in the known types but the dependency chain could get rather large and I would highly recommend not using the Operating System class at all.

You should work out what information you actually need from the Operating System class and create your own DTO to pass back in the response. That way you can ensure all the types are easily definable on your contract.

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I have added the KnownType decoration to the parent type to indicate the types of the custom classes used in the return values of the DataMembers and the same for those under hierarchy, basically everything that is not a native type is marked with [KnownType] in the DataContract. The problem still persists. –  Lord of Scripts Mar 26 '12 at 4:34
    
@LordofScripts can you create a sample project and upload it somewhere so I (and others) can take a look. –  Phill Mar 26 '12 at 4:36
    
This is the ISampleService.cs –  Lord of Scripts Mar 26 '12 at 5:29
    
In the process of making a better sample I discovered the culprit... One of my subtypes used in the DataContract is a .NET class named System.Environment.OperatingSystem. When I have it in the data contract, even if I decorate with [KnownType(typeof(System.Environment.OperatingSystem))] I would get the error. If I leave it out then the error disappears. So, how can I use those .NET classes in my DataContract without getting the error? –  Lord of Scripts Mar 26 '12 at 5:43
1  
@LordofScripts you can only serialize members which properties have been decorated with the DataMember Attribute, so would need to create a wrapper for some .Net classes. –  Silvermind Mar 26 '12 at 7:15

OK, having gone through the whole thing (thanks to all for the tips) the solution was this:

  • IsReference attribute in DataContract was not needed at all
  • IsOneWay attribute in DataContract was not needed at all even when OperationContract was returning void.
  • KnownType was also not needed provided all the subtypes in the hierarchy were my mine, in other words defined by me rather than .NET and marked with DataContract or DataMember as appropriate
  • Getting rid of OperatingSystem and building a wrapper DataContract that extracted the necesary information from OperatingSystem got around the issue.

Now there is no error in the WCF Test Client

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Does the service work if you create a test client(like a console app) and add a service reference to the wcf? If it does, then your datacontract probably has one of those types not supported by WCF Test client.

See this related issue

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The URL I see in that related issue is of the type .../Name.svc whereas the WCF Test Client shows me the following URL: localhost:8731/Design_Time_Addresses/My.WebServices/… If I use it on IE it shows nothing at all. –  Lord of Scripts Mar 26 '12 at 2:03

The WCF default expectation for a service call is request-response - WCF expects some kind of a response back.

If you want to use void (as in: no return value), you need to decorate those methods with

[OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)]
void DoSomething(UserData data);

to tell the WCF runtime not to expect any return value from the call

Read more about WCF: Working with One-Way Calls, Callbacks and Events here in MSDN Magazine.

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I have never needed the IsOneWay == true for normal bindings in a WCF contract, isn't it more suited for the DualBinding since the dual channel can send an independent response to the client? –  Silvermind Mar 23 '12 at 23:22
    
You don't have to set IsOneWay = true and you should be aware that if you do, the client won't receive any fault exceptions thrown by the server since it doesn't wait for the void response which the wcf service will return to allow fault exceptions to be passed back. –  Trevor Pilley Mar 24 '12 at 0:17
    
That didn't do anything either, same problem. My operations contract has a single parameter of a type I have defined which is marked with DataContract. That custom type has several properties marked with DataMember, each of a custom (but rather simple) type, all of these subtypes marked in their declaration as DataContract. –  Lord of Scripts Mar 26 '12 at 3:27

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