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Let's say I have a program to write text into a file (not really but that's easier to explain). I want a seperate class for each filetype like PdfType and WordType that inherit from a FileTypeMaster.

FileTypeMaster (base)
-PdfType : FileTypeMaster
-WordType : FileTypeMaster (same methods as pdftype but works different)

Now to the real problem... I want the user to decide on programstart what type to use. If he wants Pdf OR Word the methodcall should look the same (because word is new and the program was just for pdf before).

How it should work for example with pdf:

static FileTypeMaster MyFavoriteType; //declare a general var 
MyFavoriteType = new PdfType(); //cast general var to the wanted type
MyFavoriteType.CompileThis();

How it should work with word: the same but MyFavoriteType = new WordType();`

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1  
This is a bit confusing. In the first sample FileTypeMaster appears to be the name of a type, but in the second it appears to be a field whose type is MyFavoriteType. –  phoog Mar 23 '12 at 22:28
    
Included that comment in my answer –  Shingetsu Mar 23 '12 at 22:30
    
Sorry my mistake. I edited my question. (second code block) –  CodingYourLife Mar 23 '12 at 22:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Interfaces are made for that. MyFavoriteType should be an interface, with anything you will ever need (functions and proprieties) built in. Then each wanted type will implement that interface and do their own thing.

Here is a small example:

public interface Polygon
{
  float GetArea();
}
public class Square : Polygon
{
  float Side;
  public Square(float side)
  {
    Side = side;
  }
  Polygon.GetArea()
  {
    return side*side;
  } 
}

You can now do something like so:

Polygon MyPolygon = new Square(5f);
float area = MyPolygon.GetArea();

And this will work for ANY SINGLE CLASS that correctly implements Polygon interface. So this is possible:

Polygon MyPolygon = new Circle(5f);
float area = MyPolygon.GetArea();

In your case, the interface would look like so:

public interface MyFavoriteType//or name it FileTypeMaster, since that's what you want to anme it
{
  void CompileThis();
}
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I didn't know you could say IConvertable MyType = new PdfType(); (IConvertable is the interface). It also doesn't seem to work... any idea what I am doing wrong? –  CodingYourLife Mar 23 '12 at 22:48
    
sorry that works like you said. The namespace was just wrong automatically inserted to the interface. THANKS –  CodingYourLife Mar 23 '12 at 22:54

Only use a base class if you are sharing behaviour between your subclasses. If you are only sharing the method signatures and properties (e.g. each subclass doesn't really use any base class functionality) then use an interface instead.

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Yes that's what I meant. For the OP, abstract classes are usually there when you want to include FIELDS, as well as proprieties and methods. The advantage is that you can pre-write some "default" code. The disadvantage is that you can only inherit from one. –  Shingetsu Mar 23 '12 at 22:34

What you want to do here, is make use of polymorphism. Actually, you're kind off implementing the strategy design pattern here, where you have a base class (or interface)

public abstract class FileTypeMaster
{
    public abstract CompileThis();
}

And have different implementations, for Word and Pdf:

public class PdfType : FileTypeMaster
{
    public override CompileThis () {}
}

Then, in your calling program, you can create the correct implementation:

FileTypeMaster x = new PdfType();
x.CompileThis()

or

FileTypeMaster x = new WordType() x.CompileThis()

In fact, you can abstract the initialization away by using a factory class or a factory method:

public abstract class FileTypeMaster
{
    public abstract CompileThis();

    public static FileTypeMaster Create( FileType type )
    {
         switch( type )
         {
             case FileType.Word : return new WordType();

             case FileType.Pdf : return new PdfType();

             default:
                 throw new NotImplementedException();
         }
    }
}
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1  
If we're using OO, it's best to start with interfaces. Abstract classes are generally there to make some Interface Implementation code "standard" but still morph-able. –  Shingetsu Mar 23 '12 at 22:28

To add to the other posts, you then generally have a factory that given an indicator (like an enum value that represents the file type chosen by the user) generates an instance of the appropriate class and returns it as the interface type.

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In this case, the OO approach with abstraction and polymorphism is better, Language-Specific dynamic programming can be used, but it's generally harder to implement and much more closed in, if you know what I mean. –  Shingetsu Mar 23 '12 at 22:31
    
@Shingetsu I'm advocating an OO / polymorphic approach. I'd rather see 'MyFavoriteType fileInstance = MyFavoiteTypeGenerator(userSelectedType);' than 'MyFavoriteType fileInstance = new WordType();' –  That Chuck Guy Mar 23 '12 at 22:39

Your base type can be either a class or an interface. Let's say it's an interface:

interface IFileProcessor { void CompileThis(); }
class PdfProcessor : IFileProcessor { public void CompileThis() { /* ... implementation omitted ... */ }
class WordProcessor : IFileProcessor { public void CompileThis() { /* ... implementation omitted ... */ }

Then:

private enum ProcessorType
{
    Undefined,
    Word,
    Pdf
}

public void Main(string[] args)
{
    ValidateArgs(args); // implementation omitted
    ProcessorType requestedProcessor = GetRequestedProcessorFromArgs(args); // implementation omitted
    IFileProcessor processor = GetProcessor(requestedProcessor);
    processor.CompileThis();
}

private IFileProcessor GetProcessor(ProcessorType requestedProcessorType)
{
    switch (requestedProcessorType)
    {
        case ProcessorType.Pdf:
            return new PdfProcessor();
        case ProcessorType.Word:
            return new WordProcessor();
        default:
            throw new ArgumentException("requestedProcessorType");
    }
}
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