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I want to find out the following. Given a date (datetime object), what is the corresponding day of the week.

Like if Sunday is 1st day, Monday: 2nd day.. and so on

And then if the input is something like Today's date. The output is maybe 6 (since its friday)

Thanks

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6 Answers 6

up vote 110 down vote accepted

Use weekday() (docs):

>>> import datetime
>>> datetime.datetime.today()
datetime.datetime(2012, 3, 23, 23, 24, 55, 173504)
>>> datetime.datetime.today().weekday()
4

From the documentation:

Return the day of the week as an integer, where Monday is 0 and Sunday is 6.

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13  
One important thing to note is that in JavaScript 0 = Sunday, Python starts with 0 = Monday. Something that I ran into, front-end vs back-end.. –  radtek Jun 9 at 15:39

A solution whithout imports for dates after 1700/1/1

def weekDay(year, month, day):
    offset = [0, 31, 59, 90, 120, 151, 181, 212, 243, 273, 304, 334]
    week   = ['Sunday', 
              'Monday', 
              'Tuesday', 
              'Wednesday', 
              'Thursday',  
              'Friday', 
              'Saturday']
    afterFeb = 1
    if month > 2: afterFeb = 0
    aux = year - 1700 - afterFeb
    # dayOfWeek for 1700/1/1 = 5, Friday
    dayOfWeek  = 5
    # partial sum of days betweem current date and 1700/1/1
    dayOfWeek += (aux + afterFeb) * 365                  
    # leap year correction    
    dayOfWeek += aux / 4 - aux / 100 + (aux + 100) / 400     
    # sum monthly and day offsets
    dayOfWeek += offset[month - 1] + (day - 1)               
    dayOfWeek %= 7
    return dayOfWeek, week[dayOfWeek]

print weekDay(2013, 6, 15) == (6, 'Saturday')
print weekDay(1969, 7, 20) == (0, 'Sunday')
print weekDay(1945, 4, 30) == (1, 'Monday')
print weekDay(1900, 1, 1)  == (1, 'Monday')
print weekDay(1789, 7, 14) == (2, 'Tuesday')
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Why a dictionary, when a list would suffice? –  Martijn Pieters Feb 24 at 17:44
    
thanks Martijn, I don't remember why I take that option, I appreciate your call for attention, is very correct –  Arnaldo Figueira Feb 25 at 4:00

Use date.weekday() or date.isoweekday().

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I solved this for a codechef question.

import datetime
dt = '21/03/2012'
day, month, year = (int(x) for x in dt.split('/'))    
ans = datetime.date(year, month, day)
print ans.strftime("%A")
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2  
-1 (1) string not used (2)boom not used (3) using date instead of day, ludicrous variable names like bazinga and meh (4) split should have 0 args (5) needs () after close –  John Machin Mar 23 '12 at 22:56
1  
ok I removed all the unnecessary words. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Mar 23 '12 at 23:01
3  
Still using date instead of day, baz is ludicrous, 3 times int(baz(something)) is unnecessary ... consider day, month, year = (int(x) for x in dt.split('/')) or perhaps even datetime.date(*(int(x) for x in reversed(dt.split('/')))) –  John Machin Mar 23 '12 at 23:18
    
thanks @JohnMachin –  Ashwini Chaudhary Mar 23 '12 at 23:38

Assuming you are given the day, month, and year, you could do:

import datetime
DayL = ['Mon','Tues','Wednes','Thurs','Fri','Satur','Sun']
date = DayL[datetime.date(year,month,day).weekday()] + 'day'
#Set day, month, year to your value
#Now, date is set as an actual day, not a number from 0 to 6.

print(date)
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oops forgot the .weekday() afterwards. –  mathwizurd Apr 24 at 0:57

To get Sunday as 1 through Saturday as 7, this is the simplest solution to your question:

datetime.date.today().toordinal()%7 + 1

All of them:

import datetime

today = datetime.date.today()
sunday = today - datetime.timedelta(today.weekday()+1)

for i in range(7):
    tmp_date = sunday + datetime.timedelta(i)
    print tmp_date.toordinal()%7 + 1, '==', tmp_date.strftime('%A')

Output:

1 == Sunday
2 == Monday
3 == Tuesday
4 == Wednesday
5 == Thursday
6 == Friday
7 == Saturday
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