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I'm new to programming, so if the logic in the following program doesn't make sense, that's probably why. Fortunately, the following code runs and does everything I need it to, but it feels like it's taking a long time to execute (6 min. for every 10,000 records).

The purpose of the program is to assign new IDs to records in my database, and it allows the user to specify the increment value and the starting point of these IDs.

To be honest, I'm not entirely sure if the execution time is unreasonable because I don't have a lot of experience to base it off of, but if there is a way to speed it up, I'm all ears.

# generates study IDs for MS Access dataset

import pyodbc
import random
import time

startTime = time.time()

dbFile = 'C:\Backend.accdb'
conn = pyodbc.connect(r'DRIVER={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb, *.accdb)};'
                       + 'DBQ=' + dbFile + '; Provider=MSDASQL;')
cursor = conn.cursor()


# shuffle the existing IDs so the assignment of the new IDs is random
a = []
sql = "SELECT ID FROM Clients"

for row in cursor.execute(sql):
    a.append(row.ID)

print "\nIDs appended to list...\n"

random.shuffle(a)

print "\nlist shuffled\n"

# assign new IDs according to the conditions below
startPt = 900001
increment = 7
idList = {}

for i in a:
    idList[i] = startPt
    startPt += increment

# append new IDs to another table in the database
for j, k in idList.iteritems():
    sql = "INSERT INTO newID values ('%s', '%s')" %(j,k)
    cursor.execute(sql)
    conn.commit()

# close connection
cursor.close()
conn.close()

# calculate, in seconds, the time the program took to execute    
executionTime = str(time.time() - startTime)

print "completed. the program took %s seconds to execute." %executionTime
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1  
Probably codereview.stackexchange.com would be a better place for this. –  Winston Ewert Mar 23 '12 at 22:30
2  
You should be aware that backslashes in strings introduce 'escape sequences', so while your line dbFile = 'C:\Backend.accdb' works, it won't work if the first character after the backslash is r, t, n, or a handful of other letters. Use a double-backslash in single or double-quoted strings, or use raw strings (r"c:\thing"), or use forward slashes (which are usable as path separators even on Windows). –  Russell Borogove Mar 23 '12 at 22:45
1  
See docs.python.org/library/profile.html but probably just moving the conn.commit() to just before closing the connection will make a huge difference. –  agf Mar 23 '12 at 22:58
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
# shuffle the existing IDs so the assignment of the new IDs is random
a = []
sql = "SELECT ID FROM Clients"

for row in cursor.execute(sql):
    a.append(row.ID)

If you want to put everything in a list, use cursor.fetchall(), it'll create the list for you

print "\nIDs appended to list...\n"

random.shuffle(a)

print "\nlist shuffled\n"

You should be able to modify your query to shuffle it for you SELECT ID FROM Clients ORDER BY RAND() or similar. That way you don't have to do the shuffling yourself and it'll probably be faster.

for i in a:
    idList[i] = startPt
    startPt += increment

Why are you storing data in a dictionary only to operate it directly after?

# append new IDs to another table in the database
for j, k in idList.iteritems():
    sql = "INSERT INTO newID values ('%s', '%s')" %(j,k)
    cursor.execute(sql)

You should pretty much always use parameters, not string formatting

 cursor.execute("INSERT INTO newID values(?,?)", (j, k))

That's keep you safe from SQL injection. And you can also use the executemany function. It'll allow you to pass a list of different parameters and will execute the same query on many of them. That'll probably be fastest way to process the data.

    conn.commit()

You shouldn't commit after every insert. Usually you wait to commit until you are all done.

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I'd bet the vast majority of time is spent on those last two lines. Just committing only once probably speeds things up hugely. –  agf Mar 23 '12 at 22:57
    
Ah I didn't realize there was conn.commit(), i thought it executed right away. I suppose conn.commit() is lazy and optimizes the todo list? I suggested executemany() in attempt to commit once. –  robert king Mar 23 '12 at 23:05
1  
@robertking, commit forces changes to disk. That's expensive to do for every insertion. –  Winston Ewert Mar 23 '12 at 23:16
    
After moving conn.commit() out of the for loop (so it executes only once), my program now takes 3.5 seconds to execute for every 10,000 records. Thanks! –  fromabove Mar 26 '12 at 11:30
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You are inserting all the IDs into the database one at a time. You can insert them all at once using a big query:

"INSERT INTO newID values (123, 123), (456, 456), (789, 789)" (and so on)

This means you'll need to build the query string first and then execute it. If the code is still slow after that, you should use a Python code profiler to see which part is the bottleneck.

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I suggest you should print out how long it takes to do each block of code.

I think the slowest part will be inserting into newID, especially if there is a primary key on the table.

I recommend you use "execute all" for the insertions so that it does the insertions all at once.

In fact pyodbc looks to have this function:

executemany

cursor.executemany(sql, seq_of_parameters) --> None

Executes the same SQL statement for each set of parameters. seq_of_parameters is a sequence of sequences.

params = [ ('A', 1), ('B', 2) ]
executemany("insert into t(name, id) values (?, ?)", params)
This will execute the SQL statement twice, once with ('A', 1) and once with ('B', 2).

see http://code.google.com/p/pyodbc/wiki/Cursor

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