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Using the newer ASP.NET Web API, in Chrome I am seeing XML - how can I change it to request JSON so I can view it in the browser? I do believe it is just part of the request headers, am I correct in that?

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6  
There is a discussion here to make returning JSON only the default behavior: github.com/aspnet/Mvc/issues/1765 – Natan Jan 6 '15 at 17:43

21 Answers 21

up vote 857 down vote accepted

I just add the following in App_Start/WebApiConfig.cs class in my MVC Web API project.

config.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.Add(new MediaTypeHeaderValue("text/html") );

That makes sure you get json on most queries, but you can get xml when you send text/xml.

If you need to have the response Content-Type as application/json please check Todd's answer below.

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4  
I like this option it is not so heavy handed. – Eric Rohlfs Dec 19 '12 at 1:10
73  
This is a surprisingly overlooked answer, and although the original question wasn't totally clear, this directly makes JSON the default response for a web browser (which sends Accept: text/html). Good job. – gregmac Jan 15 '13 at 1:44
12  
+1 Far and away the best answer. I imagine there are a ton of ppl who opt to completely remove XML just because they don't see JSON in the browser. – Derek Hunziker Nov 16 '13 at 9:51
11  
Note that the response's Content-Type header will still be text/html. – Mrchief May 2 '14 at 17:29
11  
This is horrible. The response content type header should be application/json. This "solution" makes it text/html. – meffect Jul 10 '14 at 21:01

If you do this in the WebApiConfig you will get JSON by default, but it will still allow you to return XML if you pass text/xml as the request Accept header

public static class WebApiConfig
{
    public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
    {
        config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
            name: "DefaultApi",
            routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
            defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
        );

        var appXmlType = config.Formatters.XmlFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.FirstOrDefault(t => t.MediaType == "application/xml");
        config.Formatters.XmlFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.Remove(appXmlType);
    }
}

If you are not using the MVC project type and therefore did not have this class to begin with, see this answer for details on how to incorporate it.

share|improve this answer
39  
Just to note, the original behaviour is correct. Chrome requests application/xml with a priority of 0.9 and */* with a priority of 0.8. By removing application/xml you remove the ability for the Web API to return XML if the client requests that specifically. e.g. if you send "Accept: application/xml" you will still receive JSON. – Porges Mar 26 '13 at 21:20
9  
Is it me, or is the first sentence incorrect? The code appears to totally remove XML, not simply change the default. – NickG Apr 9 '13 at 18:24
5  
@NickG: a solution that is overlooked here and IMHO is a much better option (keeping application/xml) is the solution proposed by Felipe Leusin lower on this page. Using config.Formatters.XmlFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.Add(new MediaTypeHeaderValue("text/html")); – Cohen Jul 3 '13 at 10:10
1  
So, how do we do it via web config so we get json by default and XML if requested? – Kyle Sep 3 '13 at 1:40
3  
@Felipse Leusin's answer below is actually shorter and works better. – Ken Smith Sep 9 '13 at 13:20

MVC4 Quick Tip #3–Removing the XML Formatter from ASP.Net Web API

In Global.asax add the line:

GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.XmlFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.Clear();

like so:

protected void Application_Start()
{
    AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();

    RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
    RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);

    BundleTable.Bundles.RegisterTemplateBundles();
    GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.XmlFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.Clear();
}
share|improve this answer
8  
Works - much nicer having JSON be the default instead of XML. – Lee Whitney Apr 15 '12 at 22:38
3  
but can you still return xml then? – Thomas Stock Jul 4 '12 at 0:37
80  
I tested it, and you can't. So this is removing XML support.. Ye be warned, dear google people – Thomas Stock Jul 4 '12 at 0:42
3  
If you have a look at my answer below, this will let xml still be returned if you want to but lets the site respond with JSON to the browser – Glenn Slaven Sep 24 '12 at 1:17
3  
@GlennSlaven yeah your answer should be the one marked as the correct one. – Floradu88 Oct 14 '12 at 16:46

I like Felipe Leusin's approach best - make sure browsers get JSON without compromising content negotiation from clients that actually want XML. The only missing piece for me was that the response headers still contained content-type: text/html. Why was that a problem? Because I use the JSON Formatter Chrome extension, which inspects content-type, and I don't get the pretty formatting I'm used to. I fixed that with a simple custom formatter that accepts text/html requests and returns application/json responses:

public class BrowserJsonFormatter : JsonMediaTypeFormatter
{
    public BrowserJsonFormatter() {
        this.SupportedMediaTypes.Add(new MediaTypeHeaderValue("text/html"));
        this.SerializerSettings.Formatting = Formatting.Indented;
    }

    public override void SetDefaultContentHeaders(Type type, HttpContentHeaders headers, MediaTypeHeaderValue mediaType) {
        base.SetDefaultContentHeaders(type, headers, mediaType);
        headers.ContentType = new MediaTypeHeaderValue("application/json");
    }
}

Register like so:

config.Formatters.Add(new BrowserJsonFormatter());
share|improve this answer
14  
In the constructor add this.SerializerSettings.Formatting = Formatting.Indented; if you want it pretty-printed without a browser extension. – Alastair Maw May 15 '14 at 14:48
2  
why would you want it to pretty print over the wire? – meffect Jul 10 '14 at 21:04
5  
Isn't @dmit77 's Answer better (more concise) than this one? – H.Wolper Dec 1 '14 at 12:00
3  
@eddiegroves you dont want pretty-print over the wire. You want the server to send the least amount of bits over the wire (ie: no spaces). Then you want the browser to format it nicely, with addons and such. Javascript needs to parse the JSON usually, why make it slower by introducing unnecessary formatting – meffect Feb 12 '15 at 20:53
2  
For the googlers who are looking for: don't forget to add using System.Net.Http.Formatting and using Newtonsoft.Json – Berriel Sep 16 '15 at 1:46

In the WebApiConfig.cs, add to the end of the Register function:

// Remove the XML formatter
config.Formatters.Remove(config.Formatters.XmlFormatter);

source: http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/formats-and-model-binding/json-and-xml-serialization

share|improve this answer
    
Is XmlFormatter new in MVC4? – Glenn Slaven Jul 31 '13 at 22:41
    
In MVC5, this can be done by replacing config with GlobalConfiguration.Configuration – Steven Sep 19 '13 at 13:50
3  
For a project that must support JSON only and under no circumstance can be allowed to emit XML this is by far the best option. – Luc C Jul 15 '14 at 12:45
1  
config.Formatters.Add(config.Formatters.JsonFormatter); – Cas Bloem Apr 16 '15 at 13:41

In the Global.asax I am using the code below. My url to get JSON is http://www.digantakumar.com/api/values?json=true

protected void Application_Start()
{
    AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();

    FilterConfig.RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
    RouteConfig.RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);
    BundleConfig.RegisterBundles(BundleTable.Bundles);

    GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.JsonFormatter.MediaTypeMappings.Add(new  QueryStringMapping("json", "true", "application/json"));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great one. What is your method expect a parameter? like localhost:61044/api/values/getdate?json=true,date=2012-08-01 – LT.Nolo Sep 5 '12 at 13:04
    
what kind of format of data web api return by default. is it json or webapi ? thanks – Thomas Nov 12 '13 at 10:40

Have a look at content negotiation in the WebAPI. These (Part 1 & Part 2) wonderfully detailed and thorough blog posts explain how it works.

In short, you are right, and just need to set the Accept or Content-Type request headers. Given your Action isn't coded to return a specific format, you can set Accept: application/json.

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5  
"so I can view it in the browser" – Spongman Mar 5 '13 at 19:19
    
@Spongman, yes you can. But use an extension like REST Client - most browsers have one like it. The direct typing of url in a browser is 1. Too limiting (no control over headers, cannot post data and etc); 2. Incorrect - The browser does not consume the web api as it is intended to be consumed - you cannot rely on it testing it properly. So, again, a good REST client add-on would fix that. – Ivaylo Slavov Apr 25 '14 at 21:37

Using RequestHeaderMapping works even better, because it also sets the Content-Type = application/json in the response header, which allows Firefox (with JSONView add-on) to format the response as JSON.

GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.JsonFormatter.MediaTypeMappings.Add(new RequestHeaderMapping("Accept","text/html",StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase,true,"application/json"));
share|improve this answer
    
This is the most lean and simplest solution and Fiddler also detects the content type being returned as josn. – Steve Johnson Mar 7 '15 at 21:06
1  
Nice! Where would you suggest putting this in the code? – Tim Abell May 22 '15 at 2:40
1  
It should go in WebApiConfig.cs – Nanda Jun 25 '15 at 8:11
    
Also a great fix for the jsonformatter extension which breaks without this. – KingOfHypocrites Jul 6 '15 at 15:47
    
for some reason though the jsonp formatter extension breaks though when doing this... github.com/WebApiContrib/WebApiContrib.Formatting.Jsonp – KingOfHypocrites Jul 6 '15 at 15:50

As the question is Chrome-specific, you can get the Postman extension which allows you to set the request content type.

Postman

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One quick option is to use the MediaTypeMapping specialization. Here is an example of using QueryStringMapping in the Application_Start event:

GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.JsonFormatter.MediaTypeMappings.Add(new QueryStringMapping("a", "b", "application/json"));

Now whenever the url contains the querystring ?a=b in this case, Json response will be shown in the browser.

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2  
This was very useful. You can also use UriPathExtensionMapping instead of QueryStringMapping if you want to use path.to/item.json – Nuzzolilo Apr 13 '12 at 23:28

I choose these codes since my default is json but if i want to use the XML format. I'll just append the xml=true.

GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.XmlFormatter.MediaTypeMappings.Add(new QueryStringMapping("xml", "true", "application/xml"));
GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.Add(new MediaTypeHeaderValue("text/html"));

Thanks everyone!

share|improve this answer
    
This is the most flexible answer (and really should be the default configuration these days). To add to this answer, JSON is the default, including from browser. To view XML, add query string: ?xml=true – raider33 Mar 30 '14 at 14:04
    
Tried a number of strategies. Had a simple test for both XML and JSON and this worked out of the box – pat capozzi Jun 17 '15 at 21:55

Don't use your browser to test your API.

Instead, try to use an HTTP client that allows you to specify your request, such as CURL, or even Fiddler.

The problem with this issue is in the client, not in the API. The web API behaves correctly, according to the browser's request.

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21  
Why not use the browser? It is an obvious tool for it. – Anders Lindén Sep 18 '12 at 6:37
3  
I think the point here is correct and important - we should not overfix a working part of the application (the MVC WebAPI infrastructure) if the problem is caused by the client. The real use case for an Api is to be properly used (by supplying correct headers), which is responsibility of the application. I disagree with completely discarding the browser though - for testing, there are plenty of tools for almost any browser (Rest Client-like extensions to start with). – Ivaylo Slavov Apr 25 '14 at 21:30
2  
This should probably be a comment. – bonh May 14 '15 at 19:14

I used a global action filter to remove Accept: application/xml when the User-Agent header contains "Chrome":

internal class RemoveXmlForGoogleChromeFilter : IActionFilter
{
    public bool AllowMultiple
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> ExecuteActionFilterAsync(
        HttpActionContext actionContext,
        CancellationToken cancellationToken,
        Func<Task<HttpResponseMessage>> continuation)
    {
        var userAgent = actionContext.Request.Headers.UserAgent.ToString();
        if (userAgent.Contains("Chrome"))
        {
            var acceptHeaders = actionContext.Request.Headers.Accept;
            var header =
                acceptHeaders.SingleOrDefault(
                    x => x.MediaType.Contains("application/xml"));
            acceptHeaders.Remove(header);
        }

        return await continuation();
    }
}

Seems to work.

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I found the Chrome app "Advanced REST Client" excellent to work with REST services. You can set the Content-Type to application/json among other things: Advanced REST client

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From MSDN Building a Single Page Application with ASP.NET and AngularJS (about 41 mins in).

public static class WebApiConfig
{
    public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
    {
        // ... possible routing etc.

        // Setup to return json and camelcase it!
        var formatter = GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.JsonFormatter;
        formatter.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver =
            new Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization.CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver();
    }

It should be current, I tried it and it worked.

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Its unclear to me why there is all of this complexity in the answer. Sure there are lots of ways you can do this, with query strings, and headers and options... but what I believe to be the best practice is simple. You request a plain URL (ex: http://yourstartup.com/api/cars) and in return you get json. You get json, with the proper response header:

Content-Type: application/json

In looking for an answer to this very same question, I found this thread, and had to keep going because this accepted answer doesn't work exactly. I did find an answer which I feel is just too simple not to be the best one:

Set the default WebAPI formatter

I'll add my tip here as well.

WebApiConfig.cs

namespace com.yourstartup
{
  using ...;
  using System.Net.Http.Formatting;
  ...
  config.Formatters.Clear(); //because there are defaults of XML..
  config.Formatters.Add(new JsonMediaTypeFormatter());
}

I do have a question of where the defaults (at least the ones I am seeing) come from. Are they .NET defaults, or perhaps created somewhere else (by someone else on my project). Anways, hope this helps.

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Some time has passed since this question was asked (and answered) but another option is to override the Accept header on the server during request processing using a MessageHandler as below:

public class ForceableContentTypeDelegationHandler : DelegatingHandler
{
    protected async override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(
                HttpRequestMessage request,
                CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var someOtherCondition = false;
        var accHeader = request.Headers.GetValues("Accept").FirstOrDefault();
        if (someOtherCondition && accHeader.Contains("application/xml"))
        {
            request.Headers.Remove("Accept");
            request.Headers.Add("Accept", "application/json");
        }
        return await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);
    }
}

Where someOtherCondition can be anything including browser type, etc. This would be for conditional cases where only sometimes do we want to override the default content negotiation. Otherwise as per other answers, you would simply remove an unnecessary formatter from the configuration.

You'll need to register it of course. You can either do this globally:

  public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config) {
      config.MessageHandlers.Add(new ForceableContentTypeDelegationHandler());
  }

or on a route by route basis:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
   name: "SpecialContentRoute",
   routeTemplate: "api/someUrlThatNeedsSpecialTreatment/{id}",
   defaults: new { controller = "SpecialTreatment" id = RouteParameter.Optional },
   constraints: null,
   handler: new ForceableContentTypeDelegationHandler()
);

And since this is a message handler it will run on both the request and response ends of the pipeline much like an HttpModule. So you could easily acknowledge the override with a custom header:

public class ForceableContentTypeDelegationHandler : DelegatingHandler
{
    protected async override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(
                HttpRequestMessage request,
                CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var wasForced = false;
        var someOtherCondition = false;
        var accHeader = request.Headers.GetValues("Accept").FirstOrDefault();
        if (someOtherCondition && accHeader.Contains("application/xml"))
        {
            request.Headers.Remove("Accept");
            request.Headers.Add("Accept", "application/json");
            wasForced = true;
        }

        var response =  await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);
        if (wasForced){
          response.Headers.Add("X-ForcedContent", "We overrode your content prefs, sorry");
        }
        return response;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a solution similar to jayson.centeno's and other answers, but using the built-in extension from System.Net.Http.Formatting.

public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
{
    // add support for the 'format' query param
    // cref: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/hongyes/archive/2012/09/02/support-format-in-asp-net-web-api.aspx
    config.Formatters.JsonFormatter.AddQueryStringMapping("$format", "json", "application/json");
    config.Formatters.XmlFormatter.AddQueryStringMapping("$format", "xml", "application/xml");

    // ... additional configuration
 }

The solution was primarily geared toward supporting $format for OData in the early releases of WebApi, but it also applies to the non-OData implementation, and returns the Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8 header in the response.

It allows you to tack &$format=json or &$format=xml to the end of your uri when testing with a browser. It does not interfere with other expected behavior when using a non-browser client where you can set your own headers.

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You just change the App_Start/WebApiConfig.cs like this:

public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
    {
        // Web API configuration and services

        // Web API routes
        config.MapHttpAttributeRoutes();
        //Below formatter is used for returning the Json result.
        var appXmlType = config.Formatters.XmlFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.FirstOrDefault(t => t.MediaType == "application/xml");
        config.Formatters.XmlFormatter.SupportedMediaTypes.Remove(appXmlType);
        //Default route
        config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
           name: "ApiControllerOnly",
           routeTemplate: "api/{controller}"
       );
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Removing a formatter is generally not a good idea, you are removing functionality. – naspinski 6 hours ago
    
Actually in this case, it works well for me, also many others suggest a way like this. I've learned it from myview.rahulnivi.net/building-spa-angular-mvc-5 book! – vaheeds 2 hours ago
    
going ahead and vote down is not a good idea as well! – vaheeds 2 hours ago

Appending $format=json to the end of an MVC4+ webapi function does now return the result as json, and $format=xml returns XML. This is fine in Chrome, as it displays JSON data on-screen, but in IE you will be prompted to download the resulting json data.

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1  
I'm not having any luck getting this to work... Query option 'Format' is not allowed. To allow it, set the 'AllowedQueryOptions' property on QueryableAttribute or QueryValidationSettings. – Maslow Oct 23 '13 at 15:57
 This works for me:

 http://www.aspdotnet-suresh.com/2013/05/c-convert-datatable-to-json-string-in-c.html


 example:

 using System;
 using System.Collections.Generic;
 using System.Linq;
 using System.Net;
 using System.Net.Http;
 using System.Web.Http;
 using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

 using System.Data;
 using Asset = damWebAPI.Models.Asset;



 namespace damWebAPI.Controllers
 {
     public class AssetsController : ApiController
     {



         public string Get(int id)
         {

             // the following calls a vb .net function in another project in this solution:
             damWeb.damToolsWeb dw1 = new damWeb.damToolsWeb();
             DataTable dtAssetsCVonly = new DataTable();
             dtAssetsCVonly = dw1.getAssetCurrentVersionOnlyRec("p.", id);

             if (dtAssetsCVonly != null)
             {

                     System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer();

                     List<Dictionary<string, object>> rows = new List<Dictionary<string, object>>();
                     Dictionary<string, object> rowx;
                     foreach (DataRow dr in dtAssetsCVonly.Rows)
                     {
                         rowx = new Dictionary<string, object>();
                         foreach (DataColumn col in dtAssetsCVonly.Columns)
                         {
                             rowx.Add(col.ColumnName, dr[col]);
                         }
                         rows.Add(rowx);
                     }
                     return serializer.Serialize(rows);

             }

             return "record not found";


         }


     }
 }
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protected by Win Sep 29 '15 at 21:33

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