Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As part of an introductory animation on my site, I am attempting to have my navigation buttons show sequentially.

As the animation should go as follows:

  1. The main image #lines_home fades in
  2. The header #header fades in
  3. The navigation buttons .nav_button show fast one by one sequentially. There are 4 elements with the .nav_button class.

All elements are initially hidden, and the .nav_sub divs are show when a .nav_button is clicked.

The DOM (nav section only):

<div id="nav">
   <div id="create" class="nav_button">
      <span class="nav_text">CREATE</span>
   </div>
   <div id="create_sub" class="nav_sub">
      <ul class="nav_sub_text">
         <li id="architecture">Architectural Design</li>
         <li id="web">Web Development</li>
         <li id="lighter">Lighter Underground</li>
         <li id="digital_art">Digital Art</li>
         <li id="guitar">Guitar</li>
         <li id="sculpture">Sculpture</li>
      </ul>
   </div>
   <div id="capture" class="nav_button">
      <span class="nav_text">CAPTURE</span>
   </div>
   <div id="capture_sub" class="nav_sub">
      <ul class="nav_sub_text">
         <li id="seattle">Seattle 2012</li>
         <li id="burningman">Burning Man 2011</li>
         <li id="sanfrancisco">San Francisco 2011</li>
      </ul>
   </div>
   <div id="blog" class="nav_button">
      <span class="nav_text">BLOG</span>
   </div>
   <div id="blog_sub" class="nav_sub" >
      <ul class="nav_sub_text">
         <li>SL8</li>
      </ul>
   </div>
   <div id="about" class="nav_button">
      <span class="nav_text">ABOUT</span>
   </div>
   <div id="about_sub" class="nav_sub" >
      <ul class="nav_sub_text">
         <li id="bio">Biography</li>
         <li id="resume">Resum&eacute;</li>
      </ul>
   </div>
</div>

The scripting:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var button = document.getElementsByClass('.nav_button');
    var buttonArr = jQuery.makeArray(button);
    $('#lines_home').fadeIn(500, function(){
    $('#header').delay(100).fadeIn(500, function(){
        $(buttonArr[0]).show('fast', function () {
            $(buttonArr[1]).show('fast', function () {
                $(buttonArr[2]).show('fast', function () {
                    $(buttonArr[3]).show('fast');
                });
            });
        });
    });
    });
});

However, this does not appear to work. Does anyone have any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Why make an array just to convert each element back into jQuery individually? Instead, work with the original button object all through. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Mar 24 '12 at 0:28
1  
Why not use jQuery selector if you have jquery? –  Hogan Mar 24 '12 at 0:29
    
Check out this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/6562525/145346 –  Mottie Mar 24 '12 at 0:30
    
@Beetroot-Beetroot I'm not sure what you mean, could you please elaborate? –  SL8 Mar 24 '12 at 1:35
    
@fudgey Thank you! the solution on the page you linked to worked for me with some tweaking. –  SL8 Mar 24 '12 at 1:42
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This can be done with recursive function calls to handle any (small) number of buttons:

$(function() {
    var $buttons = $('.nav_button');
    function fadeInButton(n) {
        if (n < $buttons.length) {
            $buttons.eq(n).delay(250).show('fast', function() {
                fadeInButton(n + 1);
            });
        }
    }
    $('#lines_home').fadeIn(500, function(){
        $('#header').delay(100).fadeIn(500, function(){
            fadeInButton(0);
        });
    });
}

This is essentially your original code but differently proceduralised, and is, IMHO, a better approach than predicting the start points for each fadein and setting multiple timeouts.

The delay can be adjusted down to zero or increased as desired.

See fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! this works great. I found a slightly more streamlined method based on this. –  SL8 Mar 24 '12 at 1:51
add comment

Two ways I can think of to do this. I am torn as to which one is cleaner.

1) With delays

$(function() {
  var $home = $('#lines_home'),
      $header = $('#header'),
      $buttons = $('.nav_button');

  $home.fadeIn(500);
  $header.delay(600).fadeIn(500);
  $buttons.each(function(index) {
    var waitFor = (index * 500) + 1100;
    $(this).delay(waitFor).show();
  });
});

2) With callbacks

$(function() {
  var enterButtons = function() {
    $('.nav_button').each(function(index) {
      var waitFor = index * 500;
      $(this).delay(waitFor).show();
    });
  };

  var enterHeader = function() {
    $('#header').delay(100).fadeIn(500, enterButtons);
  };

  $('#lines_home').fadeIn(500, enterHeader);
});

Neither are tested.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. I tried both of these processes, but with no success. I need to do some research on the API about each, to make sure that I am using it correctly. –  SL8 Mar 24 '12 at 1:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.