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I'm working on an embedded systems which provides an interface with certain types.

The problem is by including certain headers from c standard library I get an error: conflicting types

I use gettimeofday and I'm only using struct timeval, yet for using this sys/time.h also drags in time_t which interferes with the one defined by the system.

I can't touch either of those pieces of code and I need them both.

Is there a way to get around such issues? (I should be able to use the systems' declared types and some functions declared in c headers, headers which contain some declarations already done by the system.)

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If you need different things with the same name in the same source file, you don't have much choices other than rename one of the things. –  Niklas B. Mar 24 '12 at 0:08
    
Could you supply some code? –  Morten Kristensen Mar 24 '12 at 0:09
1  
Which system are you using? If it's redefining standard types, then that's a problem. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 24 '12 at 0:16
1  
Are you sure the standard C and posix headers are available for use on that embedded device ? And that there isn't a similar API in the specific system headers ? –  nos Mar 24 '12 at 0:18
1  
Long term, you will be wanting to fix the C library port so that its idea of time_t matches the operating system's. –  Zack Mar 24 '12 at 0:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use macros to rename one of the time_t typedefs without modifying any headers:

#define time_t LIBC_time_t
#include <sys/time.h>
#undef time_t

#include <header_which_defines_the_time_t_you_want.h>

This is not guaranteed to work, but it does work a lot of the time.

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Nice and simple. It might be a bit delicate, if someone moves #includes around, or there are two time_t fields. Otherwise, nifty. –  gbulmer Mar 24 '12 at 1:27

One way to get around this, as a more or less last resort is to introduce another level of abstracion, and provide wrapper APIs to isolate the troublesome headers.

If you have something like this:

my_file.c:

#include <sys/time.h>
#include <some_system_header.h>

void foo(void)
{
     struct timeval tv;
     gettimeofday(&tv);
     ....
}

turns into

my_gettimeofday.c:

#include <sys/time.h> //only sys.time.h here, no system headers
#include "my_gettimeofday.h"

void my_gettimeofday(struct my_timeval *my_tv)
{
   struct timeval tv;
   gettimeofday(&tv);
   my_tv->sec  = tv.tv_sec;
   my_tv->usec = tv.tv_usec;
}

my_gettimeofday.h:

struct my_timeval {
   long sec, usec; //adjust to your platform if needed
};
void my_gettimeofday(struct my_timeval *my_tv);

my_file.c:

//no sys/time.h here.
#include <some_system_header.h>
#include "my_gettimeofday.h"
void foo(void)
{
     struct my_timeval tv;
     my_gettimeofday(&tv);
     ....
}
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If it is only one function (gettimeofday), and one type, build a 'wrapper' function in a seperate source code file, include the correct header for the call of gettimeofday.

int my_gettimeofday(struct my_timeval *restrict tp, void *restrict tzp) {
    timeval t;
    t.time_t = my_timeval.time_t;
    // ...
    int ret = gettimeofday(&t, tzp);
    my_timeval.time_t = t.time_t;
    // .. copy the others
}

Invent the new type, struct my_timeval, which is the same contents as the one that is being conflicted with. The conflicts have been seperated.

Is that it?

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