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I am trying to store a Client into a struct called IRCClient.

The compiler gives me:

ArduinoIRCd_pde.cpp.o: In function `global constructors keyed to mac':
ArduinoIRCd_pde.cpp:167: undefined reference to `Client::Client()'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

Here's the struct:

struct IRCClient {
    char *nick;
    char *user;
    char *host;
    char *name;
    int lastping;
    Client client;
};
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2 Answers 2

From the Client documentation, it seems that the Client class does not have a default constructor (ie with no parameters).

You have to specify an IP and a TPC port where to connect :

byte server[] = { 64, 233, 187, 99 }; // Google

Client client(server, 80);
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As it was already written, the Client class seems to need parameters when it is constructed. So I see 2 possibilities to store a Client instance in your structure.

Actually on my Arduino setup (1.0) it seems I cannot directly use Client, Client is a pure virtual class, it was replaced by EthernetClient.

1. Using EthernetClient (best one in my mind, but with Arduino 1.0)

Depending on your needs, maybe EthernetClient is better. It has a default constructor. http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/EthernetClient

2. Using a constructor in your struct:

struct IRCClient {
    char *nick;
    char *user;
    char *host;
    char *name;
    int lastping;
    Client client;
    IRCClient(byte * server, int port) : client(server,port) { }
};

byte server[] = { /* ip address */ };
IRCClient ircClient(server, 80);

(I could not test this solution, as I said earlier, Client is a pure virtual class in Arduino 1.0).

3. Using pointers

You can have a structure with a pointer to your Client:

struct IRCClient {
    char *nick;
    char *user;
    char *host;
    char *name;
    int lastping;
    Client *client;
};

And then, when you create your client, you store it by getting its address:

byte server[] = { /* ip address */ };
Client client(server, 80);
IRCClient ircClient;
ircClient.client = &client;

However be very careful while doing that: if your client is destroyed (end of a function scope, ...) ircClient.client will point toward... nothing.

And you need to be familiar with pointers to correctly manipulate the stored object.

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