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What the proper name of this Javascript pattern where a variable is assigned to value of a return function?

// array with a ton of random values. 
var once = (function(){

        var i = 10000, arr = [];

        while(i){
            arr.push( Math.random() * i );
            i--;
        }
        arr = arr.toString(); 

        return (function(){
            return arr;
        }());

}());

Edit - a better example:

 var once = (function(){

    // Only run a really expensive operation once...
    var i = 10000, arr = [], x;

    while(i){
        arr.push( Math.random() * i );
        i--;
    }
    arr = arr.toString(); 
    x = parseFloat(arr.toString());

    // then return the result of another function
    return function(){
        return x * (Math.random() * 10);
    };

}());

$(window).resize(function(){
    console.info(once());
});
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6  
Just "assignment"? –  dbaupp Mar 24 '12 at 1:41
    
The return value of an anonymous function, that is. Otherwise, it's just a plain old function call return. –  Michael Berkowski Mar 24 '12 at 1:42
1  
maybe "self executing function" is what you're looking for? Also in this example there doesn't seem to be any reason to return arr in a new function scope, but it may just be a contrived example. –  Andy Ray Mar 24 '12 at 1:43
    
I don't think it has a name. It's a fairly standard idiom in any language with first class functions. Are you wanting the name to know what to call it in conversation, or to learn more about it? –  Corbin Mar 24 '12 at 1:49
1  
After your edit, I think you might mean mean memoization? –  Corbin Mar 24 '12 at 1:56
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe you're looking for memoization.

In computing, memoization is an optimization technique used primarily to speed up computer programs by having function calls avoid repeating the calculation of results for previously processed inputs.

...

A memoized function "remembers" the results corresponding to some set of specific inputs. Subsequent calls with remembered inputs return the remembered result rather than recalculating it, thus eliminating the primary cost of a call with given parameters from all but the first call made to the function with those parameters.

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Ahh.. I couldn't see the forest for the trees. +1 –  gilly3 Mar 24 '12 at 2:18
    
@gilly3 If it makes you feel any better, I thought that's what he was asking too. I think we're all used to the "why does jQuery do this?" or "What does this mean?" closure questions lol. –  Corbin Mar 24 '12 at 2:36
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That is a self-invoking anonymous function.

It is useful when you want to do some work, but keep the variables out of scope. This can be particularly important if you are worried about memory leaks - the variables used in the anonymous function go immediately out of scope, and can be cleaned up by the garbage collector. Of course, if you return a closure, the opposite happens - those variables remain for the life of the closure.

Edit: Your second example is a closure. Your closure looks a lot like your self invoking anonymous function, but, as I mentioned above, it behaves quite differently.

I'd go on a bit more about closures, but I'm answering from my phone, and that kind of an answer requires all ten fingers... maybe I'll come back to this later.

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1  
well not quite "self" invoking, but that's what people call it. –  Pointy Mar 24 '12 at 1:52
    
Some people prefer the term "Immediately invoked function expression" (IIFE) to avoid the self thing. –  hugomg Mar 26 '12 at 12:58
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Is it "currying"?

A function of N arguments that is considered as a function of one argument which returns another function of N-1 arguments.

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2  
nope, this function takes no input. –  papirtiger Mar 24 '12 at 1:43
    
"Currying" refers to the practice of creating a function that captures an argument. It is not really possible to do real currying in JavaScript because JavaScript is not a lazy evaluation language. –  Pointy Mar 24 '12 at 1:52
    
@Pointy so to formally count as currying, the original function must be able to take an expression and then the curried function must be able to evaluate that expression internally at call time? Never knew that. I always assumed that just being able to bind on a primitive constituted currying. Looks like I have some Wikipedia to read :). –  Corbin Mar 24 '12 at 1:55
    
The thing is that lazy evaluation languages like Haskell are where you can really see the process in action. In "eager" languages, it's sort-of a fake. –  Pointy Mar 24 '12 at 3:03
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