Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

During reflection, is it possible in C# to check whether one constructor calls another?

class Test
{
    public Test() : this( false ) { }
    public Test( bool inner ) { }    
}

I would like to determine for each ConstructorInfo whether or not it's at the end of chain of invocation.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to do that? The call to the other constructor is compiled as a normal method call, so I think you would need to read the IL of the method to do this. –  svick Mar 24 '12 at 3:53
    
@svick I'm applying aspects, and I'd like the find the final constructor which would get called to apply the aspect on. –  Steven Jeuris Mar 24 '12 at 3:59
1  
Consider looking at Cecil or Roslyn. Cecil operates on the compiled assembly, like Reflection, but it has higher-level libraries built on top of it to support refactorings in the SharpDevelop IDE, so it might have something to make this easier. Roslyn operates on source code and gives you an object model based on that, so if you're willing to work against the source instead of binaries, it might be even easier. –  Joe White Mar 25 '12 at 1:45
    
@JoeWhite You mind posting that as an answer? I've given up on mine. Too many holes and no guarantee it would work. Cecil or Roslyn is most likely a better approach, thank you for the tip! –  Steven Jeuris Mar 25 '12 at 1:47
    
I wasn't sure how well either would work, never having tried either for anything like this. But sure, I can make it an answer. –  Joe White Mar 25 '12 at 3:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Consider looking at Cecil or Roslyn.

Cecil operates on the compiled assembly, like Reflection does. it has higher-level libraries built on top of it to support refactorings in the SharpDevelop IDE, so it might have something to make this easier.

Roslyn operates on source code and gives you an object model based on that, so if you're willing to work against the source instead of binaries, it might be even easier to work with.

(I've never actually used Cecil for anything like this and I've never used Roslyn at all, so I can't do much more than point you at the projects and wish you luck. If you do manage to get something working, I'd be interested to hear how it went!)

share|improve this answer
    
I've accepted this answer as it's probably a better approach than the one I posted. A word of warning though, I haven't gotten around to trying it yet! –  Steven Jeuris Jun 14 '12 at 21:02

This is a temporary answer, to state what I found so far.

I didn't find any property of ConstructorInfo which could indicate whether the constructor calls another constructor or not. Neither did the properties of MethodBody.

I am having somewhat success evaluating the MSIL byte code. My first findings indicate the constructor which is eventually called starts out with OpCodes.Call immediately, except for a few possible other OpCodes. Constructors which call other constructors have 'unexpected' OpCodes.

public static bool CallsOtherConstructor( this ConstructorInfo constructor )
{
    MethodBody body = constructor.GetMethodBody();
    if ( body == null )
    {
        throw new ArgumentException( "Constructors are expected to always contain byte code." );
    }

    // Constructors at the end of the invocation chain start with 'call' immediately.
    var untilCall = body.GetILAsByteArray().TakeWhile( b => b != OpCodes.Call.Value );
    return !untilCall.All( b =>
        b == OpCodes.Nop.Value ||     // Never encountered, but my intuition tells me a no-op would be valid.
        b == OpCodes.Ldarg_0.Value || // Seems to always precede Call immediately.
        b == OpCodes.Ldarg_1.Value    // Seems to be added when calling base constructor.
        );
}

I'm not sure at all about MSIL. Perhaps it's impossible to have no-ops in between there, or there is no need at all to start out a constructor like that, but for all my current unit tests it seems to work.

[TestClass]
public class ConstructorInfoExtensionsTest
{
    class PublicConstructors
    {
        // First
        public PublicConstructors() : this( true ) {}

        // Second
        public PublicConstructors( bool one ) : this( true, true ) {}

        // Final
        public PublicConstructors( bool one, bool two ) {}

        // Alternate final
        public PublicConstructors( bool one, bool two, bool three ) {}
    }

    class PrivateConstructors
    {
        // First
        PrivateConstructors() : this( true ) {}

        // Second
        PrivateConstructors( bool one ) : this( true, true ) {}

        // Final
        PrivateConstructors( bool one, bool two ) {}

        // Alternate final
        PrivateConstructors( bool one, bool two, bool three ) {}
    }

    class TripleBaseConstructors : DoubleBaseConstructors
    {
        public TripleBaseConstructors() : base() { }
        public TripleBaseConstructors( bool one ) : base( one ) { }
    }

    class DoubleBaseConstructors : BaseConstructors
    {
        public DoubleBaseConstructors() : base() {}
        public DoubleBaseConstructors( bool one ) : base( one ) {}
    }

    class BaseConstructors : Base
    {
        public BaseConstructors() : base() {}
        public BaseConstructors( bool one ) : base( one ) {}
    }

    class Base
    {
        // No parameters
        public Base() {}

        // One parameter
        public Base( bool one ) {} 
    }

    class ContentConstructor
    {
        public ContentConstructor()
        {
            SomeMethod();
        }

        public ContentConstructor( bool one )
        {
            int bleh = 0;
        }

        bool setTwo;
        public ContentConstructor( bool one, bool two )
        {
            setTwo = two;
        }

        void SomeMethod() {}
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void CallsOtherConstructorTest()
    {           
        Action<ConstructorInfo[]> checkConstructors = cs =>
        {
            ConstructorInfo first = cs.Where( c => c.GetParameters().Count() == 0 ).First();
            Assert.IsTrue( first.CallsOtherConstructor() );
            ConstructorInfo second = cs.Where( c => c.GetParameters().Count() == 1 ).First();
            Assert.IsTrue( second.CallsOtherConstructor() );
            ConstructorInfo final = cs.Where( c => c.GetParameters().Count() == 2 ).First();
            Assert.IsFalse( final.CallsOtherConstructor() );
            ConstructorInfo alternateFinal = cs.Where( c => c.GetParameters().Count() == 3 ).First();
            Assert.IsFalse( alternateFinal.CallsOtherConstructor() );
        };

        // Public and private constructors.
        checkConstructors( typeof( PublicConstructors ).GetConstructors() );
        checkConstructors( typeof( PrivateConstructors ).GetConstructors( BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance ) );

        // Inheritance.
        Action<ConstructorInfo[]> checkBaseConstructors = cs =>
        {
            ConstructorInfo noParameters = cs.Where( c => c.GetParameters().Count() == 0 ).First();
            ConstructorInfo oneParameter = cs.Where( c => c.GetParameters().Count() == 1 ).First();

            // Only interested in constructors specified on this type, not base constructors,
            // thus calling a base constructor shouldn't qualify as 'true'.
            Assert.IsFalse( noParameters.CallsOtherConstructor() );
            Assert.IsFalse( oneParameter.CallsOtherConstructor() );
        };
        checkBaseConstructors( typeof( BaseConstructors ).GetConstructors() );
        checkBaseConstructors( typeof( DoubleBaseConstructors ).GetConstructors() );
        checkBaseConstructors( typeof( TripleBaseConstructors ).GetConstructors() );

        // Constructor with content.
        foreach( var constructor in typeof( ContentConstructor ).GetConstructors() )
        {
            Assert.IsFalse( constructor.CallsOtherConstructor() );
        }               
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
A useful resource of all the byte codes can be found here. –  Steven Jeuris Mar 24 '12 at 4:02
    
Constructors which call base constructors seem to to have a OpCodes.Ldarg_1 value after OpCodes.Ldarg_0. –  Steven Jeuris Mar 24 '12 at 4:29
    
The updated version doesn't seem to work for inner class constructors yet. –  Steven Jeuris Mar 24 '12 at 5:33
1  
It appears that the byte preceding the RET will be Ldloc_0 if a constructor calls an inner ctor and Stloc_0 if it doesn't call anything. Haven't checked for a call to a base ctor. –  annakata May 31 '13 at 9:14

what you can do is to add a property to the object telling the aspect was applied. So, you won't be applying the aspect several times as you can check that property. It's not what you asked but it may help you with your underlying issue.

share|improve this answer
1  
That wouldn't guarantee that the aspect code would be executed for every possible constructor invocation. Unless you are implying the code I add to every constructor is aware of a property which causes it to only be executed once? That might work. –  Steven Jeuris Mar 24 '12 at 4:11
    
yep, that's the idea –  ivowiblo Mar 25 '12 at 1:19

As far as I know, you cannot check or inspect code using reflection in an easy fashion. All reflection lets you do is reflect on the metadata information of the assembly.

You can use GetMethodBody to grab the content of the method, but then you will have to actually parse it and understand the IL yourself.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.