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Just curious. If you have 4Gb of free memory and you create 10k of garbage per minute. Will the GC trigger every minute? In my situation it would be preferable to delay the GC or not execute it at all. Any thoughts and ideas about the best GC to use in order to accomplish something like this?

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try making eden space very large? –  Kevin Mar 24 '12 at 5:00
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No, the default garbage collector (serial GC) will not run until the memory is full ( either the Eden space or the old generation space).

if you want to minimize the garbage collector running time in your case try to maximize the Eden space:

java -Xms2g -Xmx3g -XX:NewSize=500m -XX:MaxNewSize=1024m yourApplication

the above settings, will run your application with 3g maximum memory, and the Eden space will be 1g at max, so any new allocated object will be stored in this space, and the (default) garbage collector will not run until this space is filled with objects.

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Is there any kind of hack to turn off GC execution until free memory is approaching zero?

No, there isn't. You don't have that level of control from within an application. On the other hand ...

If you have 4Gb of free memory and you create 10k of garbage per minute. Will the GC trigger every minute?

No it won't. The GC runs when the JVM figures that it is the best time to do it. The "best time" depends on what the GC is trying to optimize for; e.g. for throughput, or to minimize pauses:

  • In the former case, it will be when the Eden space (where new objects are created) doesn't have space for an object you want to create.

  • In the latter case, it will be when the amount of free memory in (typically) the Eden space drops below a (configurable) threshold level.

But generally speaking, you don't need to worry about the JVM running the garbage collector unnecessarily. It won't.

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Run your app with the -verbose:gc option, and you can see logs of all garbage collection dumped to the screen, which will give you a good picture of what is going on in the virtual machine.

You can also use Visual VM to monitor behavior.

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