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I am currently working on Problem 62

I have tried the following code to solve it:

data Tree a = Empty | Branch a (Tree a) (Tree a)
              deriving (Show, Eq)

internals :: Tree a -> [a]

internals (Branch a Empty Empty) = []

internals (Branch a b c) = [a]++(internals b)++(internals c)

internals (Branch a b Empty) = [a]++(internals b)

internals (Branch a Empty c) = [a]++(internals c)

Which basically says:

  1. If both the children are empty don't include that list element in the list of internals.
  2. If both children are non-empty, that node (a) is an internal include it, and keep checking to see any of a's children are also internal.
  3. If one of the children is non-empty, that node is internal, and recursively keep checking if the child is also an internal node.

In GHCi I have ran the following:

> let tree4 = Branch 1 (Branch 2 Empty (Branch 4 Empty Empty)) (Branch 2 Empty Empty)
> internals tree4

and get the following runtime error:

[1,2*** Exception: Untitled.hs:(6,1)-(12,49): Non-exhaustive patterns in function internals

I don't understand why this thing is non-exhaustive, I thought it would go to branch 1, notice it's children are non-empty, then go down both branch 2s and find out one branch is empty, one is not, stop at the one that is, and keep going down the one that isn't, until branch "4", and end it there. It sort of does, I do get 1, 2 in the list, but why is it not exhaustive?

Thanks in advanced.

Thank you for the help Tikhon changed my function to this:

data Tree a = Empty | Branch a (Tree a) (Tree a)
              deriving (Show, Eq)

internals :: Tree a -> [a]

internals (Branch a Empty Empty) = []

internals (Branch a b Empty) = [a]++(internals b)

internals (Branch a Empty c) = [a]++(internals c)

internals (Branch a b c) = [a]++(internals b)++(internals c)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The order of patterns matters. Since Branch a b c matches everything that isn't just Empty, including something like Branch a b Empty, your third and fourth cases never get hit.

This should fix it:

internals :: Tree a -> [a]
internals (Branch a Empty Empty) = []
internals (Branch a b Empty)     = [a] ++ internals b
internals (Branch a Empty c)     = [a] ++ internals c
internals (Branch a b c)         = [a] ++ internals b ++ internals c
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Oh thanks that worked perfect. Thanks you so much. –  Bair Mar 24 '12 at 5:31

The other answer doesn't actually solve the reason for the error message, it does resolve one problem though (the fact that the order of patterns is significant).

The error message is Non-exhaustive patterns, which means that internals is being called with a value that doesn't match any of the patterns (this value is Empty). As Tikhon said, it is because Branch a b c matches all Branches, so the later patterns are never used and an Empty can slip through. We can see what happens if we trace the execution of internals (Branch 1 (Branch 2 Empty Empty) Empty) (assume strict-ish evaluation, it makes the exposition simpler):

internals (Branch 1 (Branch 2 Empty Empty) Empty) =>
[1] ++ internals (Branch 2 Empty Empty) ++ internals Empty =>
[1] ++ [] ++ internals Empty =>
[1] ++ internals Empty =>
[1] ++ ???

The proper fix will mean that can't happen, i.e. one that converts internals from a partial function (undefined for some input values) to a total function (defined for all input). Total functions are much much nicer than partial ones, especially in Haskell, where the type system gives the programmer the ability to mark "partial" functions as such at compile time (e.g. via Maybe or Either).

We can think about the recursion from the bottom-up, i.e. work out the base cases:

  • the empty tree has no internal nodes
  • a tree that is a single node has no internal nodes

We recur on any tree that doesn't satisfy either of these; in which case, the current node is an internal node (so add that to the list), and there might be internal nodes in the children, so check them too.

We can express this in Haskell:

internals :: Tree a -> [a]

internals Empty = [] 
internals (Branch a Empty Empty) = []

internals (Branch a b c) = [a] ++ internals b ++ internals c

This has the added bonus of making the code neater and shorter: we don't have to worry about the details of the children in the recursion, there is a base case that handles any Emptys.

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