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Here is my code (well, some of it). The question I have is, can I get the first 9 numbers to show with a leading 00 and numbers 10 - 99 with a leading 0.

I have to show all of the 360 monthly payments, but if I don't have all month numbers at the same length, then I end up with an output file that keeps moving to the right and offsetting the look of the output.

System.out.print((x + 1) + "  ");  // the payment number
System.out.print(formatter.format(monthlyInterest) + "   ");    // round our interest rate
System.out.print(formatter.format(principleAmt) + "     ");
System.out.print(formatter.format(remainderAmt) + "     ");
System.out.println();

Results:

8 $951.23 $215.92 $198,301.22
9 $950.19 $216.95 $198,084.26
10 $949.15 $217.99 $197,866.27
11 $948.11 $219.04 $197,647.23

What I want to see is:

008 $951.23 $215.92 $198,301.22
009 $950.19 $216.95 $198,084.26
010 $949.15 $217.99 $197,866.27
011 $948.11 $219.04 $197,647.23

What other code do you need to see from my class that could help?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Since you're using formatters for the rest of it, just use DecimalFormat:

import java.text.DecimalFormat;

DecimalFormat xFormat = new DecimalFormat("000")
System.out.print(xFormat.format(x + 1) + " ");

Alternative you could do whole job in whole line using printf:

System.out.printf("%03d %s  %s    %s    \n", 
        x + 1, // the payment number
        formatter.format(monthlyInterest),  // round our interest rate
        formatter.format(principleAmt),
        formatter.format(remainderAmt));
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What I did was used: import java.text.DecimalFormat; Then I used Adam's suggestion with a little editing. Thank you Adam! DecimalFormat newFormat = new DecimalFormat("000"); System.out.print(newFormat.format(x + 1) + " "); > 008 $951.23 $215.92 $198,301.22 009 $950.19 $216.95 $198,084.26 010 $949.15 $217.99 $197,866.27 011 $948.11 $219.04 $197,647.23 –  dot3tech Mar 24 '12 at 7:26

Use System.out.format

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Since you are using Java, printf is available from version 1.5

You may use it like this

System.out.printf("%03d ", x);

For Example:

System.out.printf("%03d ", 5);
System.out.printf("%03d ", 55);
System.out.printf("%03d ", 555);

Will Give You

005 055 555

as output

See: System.out.printf and Format String Syntax

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Something likes this

public void testPrintOut() {
    int val1 = 8;
    String val2 = "$951.23";
    String val3 = "$215.92";
    String val4 = "$198,301.22";
    System.out.println(String.format("%03d %7s %7s %11s", val1, val2, val3, val4));

    val1 = 9;
    val2 = "$950.19";
    val3 = "$216.95";
    val4 = "$198,084.26";
    System.out.println(String.format("%03d %7s %7s %11s", val1, val2, val3, val4));
}
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Are you sure you want "055" as opposed to " 55"? Some programs interpret a leading zero as meaning octal, so that it would read 055 as (decimal) 45 instead of (decimal) 55.

That should just mean dropping the '0' (zero-fill) flag.

e.g., change System.out.printf("%03d ", x); to the simpler System.out.printf("%3d ", x);

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