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I was just trying out some code, not a experienced coder. I implemented(at least think) Level Order traversal and it sorta got done pretty easily. Want to know if its the right approach.

#include<iostream>
#include<queue>
using namespace std;

class node {
public :
  node *right;
  node *left;
  int info;
}*root;

queue<int> inf;

void bfs(node *t)
{
if(t!=NULL)
{
    if(t->right!=NULL)
        inf.push(t->right->info);

    if(t->left!=NULL)
        inf.push(t->left->info);

    bfs(t->right);
    bfs(t->left);
}
}

int main()
{
node *temp = new node();
temp->info = 1;

root = temp;

root->right = new node();
root->right->info = 2;
root->right->right = root->right->left = NULL;

root->left = new node();
root->left->info = 3;
root->left->right = root->left->left = NULL;

node *tmp = root;
root=root->right;

root->right = new node();
root->right->info = 4;
root->right->right = root->right->left = NULL;

root->left = new node();
root->left->info = 5;
root->left->right = root->left->left = NULL;

root = tmp;
root = root->left;

root->right = new node();
root->right->info = 6;
root->right->right = root->right->left = NULL;

root->left = new node();
root->left->info = 7;
root->left->right = root->left->left = NULL;

root = temp;


node *it;
it = root;

inf.push(root->info);


bfs(root);
for(;inf.size()!=0;)
{
    cout<<inf.front()<<" : ";
    inf.pop();
}

return 0;

}

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This uses a std::queue<int> to print the nodes in DFS order! Just using a queue somewhere doesn't make the traversal order BFS. What you want is a std:: queue<node*> where you put the root node. Then you iterate while the queue isn't empty and in each iteration you take the next node out of the queue and put its children into the queue:

for (std::queue<node*> inf(1, root); !inf.empty(); inf.pop()) {
    n = inf.front();
    process(n->info);
    if (n->left) inf.push(n->left);
    if (n->right) inf.push(n->right);
}

Just a few notes:

  1. Don't use size() on a container to determine if there are elements: it may e.g. walk through the elements to count them (although none of the standard containers does) and empty() says what you actually want to know ( although it should have been called is_empty()).
  2. Do not use global variables.
  3. Your program seems to leak all node objects.
  4. You should give your node class a constructor to initialize the pointers for the children and the info.
share|improve this answer

Yeah you are doing well, but You are implementing DFS algorithm.because "it goes deeper until it reaches to a leaf and then back tracks."

and it is cleaner to change the for to a while:

while(inf.size())
{
    cout<<inf.front()<<" : ";
    inf.pop();
}
share|improve this answer

You are filling the queue, but you are not using it in your traversal of the tree. You are later using it for printing the nodes in the order you have visited them, but this order is DFS and not BFS. Also you could immediately print the nodes in this simple case, there is no need for the queue currently.

Here is the actuall DFS algorithm in C++ like pseudocode:

queue q;
q.push_back( tree.root() );

while( !q.empty() ) {
  node n = q.pop_front();
  // Visit n here (i.e. print it in your case)
  for all( c in n.children() ) {
    q.push_back( c );
  }
}

As you can see there is no recursive call at all with BFS.

If you use recursion, this usually means to use a simple available stack data structure. However for BFS you want to use an actual queue. Your implementation is roughly equivalent to the following algorithm (I just replaced the recursion by an actuall explicit stack):

stack s;
s.push( tree.root() );

while( !s.empty() ) {
   node n = s.pop();
  // Visit n here (i.e. print it in your case)
  for all( c in n.children() ) {
    s.push( c );
  }
}

It is very similar, however it is changing the order by using a stack.

share|improve this answer
    
I get your point, well I was trying to print the values in a tree based on the level, that is starting from level 0[root] to level n[leaves]. But yeah I get what you say! Thanks. –  Aadi Droid Mar 24 '12 at 11:37
1  
@AadiDroid: Yes, this is the way BFS will walk your tree. Each level after another. However you are using DFS and this first goes to the depth. The queue you are using will just print the nodes later, not in a different order. –  LiKao Mar 24 '12 at 13:55

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