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How do I specialize a nested template? (See error below.)

using std::reverse_iterator;

template<typename It>
reverse_iterator<It> make_reverse_iterator(const It &it)
{
    return reverse_iterator<It>(it);
}

template<typename It>
It make_reverse_iterator<reverse_iterator<It> >(const reverse_iterator<It> &it)
{
    // Above                     ^
    // error C2768:
    //   'make_reverse_iterator': illegal use of explicit template arguments
    return it.base();
}
share|improve this question
    
Where is the nested template in the example? All I see is a partial function specialization, which is not allowed. – R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 24 '12 at 9:35
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: Maybe I used the wrong term... I meant specializing for the templated reverse_iterator<It>, based on the (nested) type It. – Mehrdad Mar 24 '12 at 9:35
    
Partial specialization of function templates is not allowed -- isn't this what's going on here? – Jon Mar 24 '12 at 9:36
    
Oh. I see...... – R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 24 '12 at 9:36
    
@Jon: Perhaps..? I don't know, what's "partial" about it? It looks fully specialized to me (unless I'm misunderstanding the term). – Mehrdad Mar 24 '12 at 9:37
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is a partial specialization of a function template. This is not allowed.

You can solve the problem in this example with an overload instead:

template<typename It>
It make_reverse_iterator(const reverse_iterator<It> &it)
{
    return it.base();
}

In cases where overloads don't work you can resort to partial specialization of class templates.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but why is it called "partial"? – Mehrdad Mar 24 '12 at 9:39
    
I was under the impression that the usual workaround is overloading the function...? – Jon Mar 24 '12 at 9:41
    
@Jon: Oh, I didn't notice that overloading actually worked in this case (it's not always possible to do it with overloads) Thanks, will edit. – R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 24 '12 at 9:43

This is a partial function template specialization, which is not allowed. You can however achieve the same effect by overloading the function:

template<typename It>
It make_reverse_iterator(const reverse_iterator<It> &it)
{
    return it.base();
}

The above is not a template specialization, but a template overload of make_reverse_iterator where the parameter is a const_reverse_iterator<It>.

share|improve this answer
    
Something tells me Dimov/Abrahams might apply here, and so only one of the solutions here is correct, but not both (overloading or specialization, I do not know which). Any idea? – Mehrdad Mar 24 '12 at 9:45

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