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I need to check file extension when search over a directory.

if using re to do the matching work. those '.' is interpreted as regex '.'

my code:

extension = ['.c','.h']
path = 'foo\bar\foobar.c'

def skipCheck(path):
    global extension 
    skip = True
    for i in extension :
        if(re.search(i,path)):
            skip = False
return skip

I know I could use backslash to do this.

extension = ['\.c','\.h']

But it is not easy to use and configure.I want to keep the ['.c','.h'] input style.

Is there a way to convert and save them to another list of raw string for re.search.

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2  
"Raw string" means a literal of the form r"foo". What you have are just, well, strings. –  katrielalex Mar 24 '12 at 10:56
    
The regexes you're proposing will also catch files like 'spam.ham.eggs' and '.config'. –  Karl Knechtel Mar 24 '12 at 14:44
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted
  1. Don't use regexen; Python already has os.path.splitext.

    def skip_check(path):
        return os.path.splitext(path)[1] in extensions
    

    If you really must use a regex, you can call re.escape to escape all regex metacharacters.

  2. Don't declare extension global; you're not assigning to it so you don't need to. Also, you should call it extensions.

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This will have difficulties if one of the extensions has multiple separators (".tar.gz"), which is a use case I often encounter. –  DSM Mar 24 '12 at 10:57
1  
@DSM: true -- but then there isn't a well-defined behaviour for multiple extensions. .tar.gz is common, but .dvi.pdf isn't. (Note that .tar.gz is in fact a tarfile that's been gzipped. It actually is two extensions.) –  katrielalex Mar 24 '12 at 11:01
1  
The syntactic number of extensions [given some set to draw from] doesn't always correspond to the semantic number, so I've often needed to branch on something like filename.endswith((".tar.gz", ".tgz")) even though ".tar.gz" has two extensions and ".tgz" has one. +1 anyway, it's simply annoying that the right thing to do doesn't work so nicely in a common case. –  DSM Mar 24 '12 at 11:29
    
thanks,@katrielalex ,i'll take your answer. –  oyss Mar 26 '12 at 0:31
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