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I am coding a service which will handle articles (CRUD).

The persistence layer is handles by an ArticleManager >which does Repository and CRUD actions.

Now I want to implement two attributes: createdAt and >updatedAt

My question is now where I should place them: In the entity, in the ArticleManager, somewhere else?

Best Regards, Bodo

Ah,

I see, the FOSUserBundle handles this task with an EventListener:

https://github.com/FriendsOfSymfony/FOSUserBundle/blob/master/Entity/UserListener.php

But thank you for youre help :)

<?php

namespace LOC\ArticleBundle\Entity;

use Doctrine\Common\EventSubscriber;
use Doctrine\ORM\Events;
use Doctrine\ORM\Event\LifecycleEventArgs;
use Doctrine\ORM\Event\PreUpdateEventArgs;
use LOC\ArticleBundle\Model\ArticleInterface;
use Symfony\Component\DependencyInjection\ContainerInterface;


class ArticleListener implements EventSubscriber
{
private $articleManager;
private $container;

public function __construct(ContainerInterface $container)
{
    $this->container = $container;
}

public function getSubscribedEvents()
{
    return array(
        Events::prePersist,
        Events::preUpdate,
    );
}

public function prePersist(LifecycleEventArgs $args)
{
    $article = $args->getEntity();

    $article->setCreatedAt(new \DateTime());

    $this->articleManager->updateArticle($article);
}

public function preUpdate(PreUpdateEventArgs $args)
{
    $article = $args->getEntity();

    $article->setUpdatedAt(new \DateTime());

    $this->articleManager->updateArticle($article);
}
}
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2 Answers

Well, there is a bundle for such stuff, the DoctrineExtensionsBundle. It got Timestampable and slugable.

If you want to do it on your own, the place is definitly in the Entity itself, as you don't want to mess around in your controller. Here is how I do the Timestampable as I don't use the DoctrineExtensionsBundle:

/**
 * @ORM\Entity
 * @ORM\Table(name="entity")
 * @ORM\HasLifecycleCallbacks
 */
class Entity {
    // ...

    /**
     * @ORM\Column(name="created_at", type="datetime", nullable=false)
     */
    protected $createdAt;

    /**
     * @ORM\Column(name="updated_at", type="datetime", nullable=false)
     */
    protected $updatedAt;

    /**
     * @ORM\prePersist
     */
    public function prePersist() {
        $this->createdAt = new \DateTime();
        $this->updatedAt = new \DateTime();
    }

    /**
     * @ORM\preUpdate
     */
    public function preUpdate() {
        $this->updatedAt = new \DateTime();
    }

    // ...

}

As for my decision not to use the Bundle: When symfony2 was released as stable, this bundle didn't exist (or it wasn't stable, I don't remember) so I started doing it on my own like shown below. As it is little overhead, I kept doing it like this and never felt the need to change it. If you need Slugable or want to keep it simply, try the bundle!

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FYI, new \DateTime is enough to get the current datetime. –  Elnur Abdurrakhimov Mar 24 '12 at 12:56
    
You are right. Don't know why I put it in there but 'now' is indeed the default. Thanks for the hint! Will delete it above! –  Sgoettschkes Mar 24 '12 at 12:58
    
Hi, The ArticleBundle is used as service and I access the entities over an articleManager. So wouldn't it be better to place a protected method generateSlug and to set the properties createdAt in the createArticle-method and updatedAt in the updateArticle-method I hope I written this understandable :) –  bodokaiser Mar 24 '12 at 13:16
    
Why would this be better? Is there any example you can think of where you want to update your entity and leave the updatedAt untouched? If not, keep the code in your entity so no class has to know about the functionality for this timestamps. Your Manager does not need to know about when or how to update such internal behaviour. –  Sgoettschkes Mar 24 '12 at 13:24
    
I agree! But how should I implement this in detail: I have one abstract class holding the setters and getters as well as the properties this is the Model/Article. This Class gets extended for ORM, ODM, CouchDB, Propel and so on. I could handle createdAt with the constructor but what is with updatedAt and the slug?? –  bodokaiser Mar 24 '12 at 13:47
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In the entity, since that's where they belong logically.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, The ArticleBundle is used as service and I access the entities over an articleManager. So wouldn't it be better to place a protected method generateSlug and to set the properties createdAt in the createArticle-method and updatedAt in the updateArticle-method I hope I written this understandable :) –  bodokaiser Mar 24 '12 at 13:17
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