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#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <QString>
using namespace std;

class A {
public:
    static const int i = 9;
    static const int PI = 1.3;
    static const char ch = 's';
    static const string str = "hello world"; // <--- error
    static const QString str2 = "hello world"; // <--- error
};

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    cout << "Hello world" << endl;

    return 0 ;
}

As the code gives everything, how can I init a string.

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2  
The question has been answered, but just for the next time: say what error get exactly. –  Mr Lister Mar 24 '12 at 12:54
    
@MrLister it's working fine now. But I wonder how const can be declared later! –  Dewsworld Mar 24 '12 at 13:09
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Non-integral type members (that includes string and your user-defined types), need to be initialized outside the class definition, in a single implementation file (.cc or .cpp usually).

In your case, since you didn't separate the class definition in a header, you can initialize the statics right after your class:

class A {
public:
    static const int i = 9;
    static const int PI = 1.3;
    static const char ch = 's';
    static const string str;
    static const QString str2;
};


const string A::str = "hello world";
const QString A::str2 = "hello world";

EDIT: Besides this, as Nawaz pointed out, the header file that defines string is <string>, not <cstring>.

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1  
It's not "user-defined members". In C++03 it's "non-integral types", and in C++11 its anything that doesn't have a constant-expression initialization. –  Kerrek SB Mar 24 '12 at 12:57
    
@KerrekSB: Actually, to be precise only static const integers & enums can have In-Class Initialization in C++03. –  Alok Save Mar 24 '12 at 13:02
1  
@Als so why does char work for him? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 24 '12 at 13:02
1  
@LuchianGrigore: char is an integral type. –  Kerrek SB Mar 24 '12 at 13:03
    
@LuchianGrigore: char is an integral-type (I think, integer is a misleading term). Try float or double, they will not compile. –  Nawaz Mar 24 '12 at 13:03
show 6 more comments
  • First thing first. You've not included <string>. So do that first:

    #include <string>
    

    std::string is defined in <string>, not in <cstring> as you probably might think.

  • After that in C++03, initialization of the non-integral static member of a class, must be outside the class.

  • In C++11, your code will compile if you only include <string>. No need to define the static member outside the class.

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2  
+1 so in C++11 you can initialize any statics in the class definition? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 24 '12 at 12:55
    
@LuchianGrigore: Yes. –  Nawaz Mar 24 '12 at 12:57
    
@Nawaz Thanks it's working. But I doubt what is <cstring> then? Becuase I thougt it is somewhat modern string version!! –  Dewsworld Mar 24 '12 at 13:14
    
@Dewsworld: <cstring> (in C++) contains what <string.h> (in C) contains. <cstring> is just add namespace to all the members found in <string.h>. For example, in C you use strlen() which is defined in <string.h>; in C++ you use std::strlen() which is defined in <cstring> –  Nawaz Mar 24 '12 at 13:51
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