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I'm looking to create a ruled page effect in CSS or Javascript/JQuery, for example. I know this can be achieved with CSS by setting a fixed line height and create a background image to suit.

I would, however, prefer to create a vector solution (ie no images) much like this, but I need it to work in IE.


Is it possible to generate this effect without use of images that works across all modern browsers?


The ideal solution would be to detect the top and bottom of a line in paragraph and draw a line in between with javascript - so it'll work with undefined line heights (but I'm happy to define them if necessary).


I forgot to mention that the text is dynamic.

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Do you want the rules to go all the way across even on widowed lines of text (i.e., short ends of paragraphs)? –  Robusto Mar 24 '12 at 12:57
    
Also, which IE? Is IE9 good enough, or do you need backwards compatibility with 8, 7 (and, heaven forfend, 6)? –  Robusto Mar 24 '12 at 13:01
    
Yes. I would it to go all the way to the edge of the paragraph block even if the text is widowed. –  Ryan King Mar 24 '12 at 13:02
    
I'd be happy with IE8 but 7 would be nice. –  Ryan King Mar 24 '12 at 13:05
    
However if you have a solution that is only IE9 compatible, I would like to see. –  Ryan King Mar 24 '12 at 13:10
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try heading in this direction: http://jsfiddle.net/Jw8pw/ It's very basic but You can get more in depth, if you consider the line border height, the text position. Basically everything needs to be based on em height. Use a transparent div for the margin with a border and divs for hole punches via border radius.

Just added some more: to it http://jsfiddle.net/jugularkill/Jw8pw/6/

You will need to write a script to manually add the line divs so they fill the paper past the overflow but not too much.

  • Estimate how many pixels to em you use in the max case, (lets say 40px), You will do something like "height of text #content div" divided by custom (40px)ratio, add 10 (to be on the safe side), and that's how many lines you need to "write"

  • The #paper has no overflow so more div lines are welcomed but too much over (as in hundreds) is a bit lazy

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After you manage to get the text sitting nicely on the line it may be an idea to scrap the border-bottom and instead use divs as margins inside each ".line" div . Each sticking to the bottom (top:auto; bottom:0px) at maybe 2px height). borders complicate the formation in this case and looks tacky on the screen via em. –  Julien Etienne Mar 24 '12 at 13:53
    
I forgot mention the content is dynamic. This could be useful provided you could detect how many lines are displayed and dynamically create the right amount of .line divs. Is that possible in js? –  Ryan King Mar 24 '12 at 22:09
    
I just updated my answer, make sure you do the script to calculate the lines it should be a lot easier now. ;) –  Julien Etienne Mar 25 '12 at 0:00
    
Thanks Julien, I'm a little uncomfortable with filling my markup with '.line' divs but this does exactly what I asked for give a little tweeking. –  Ryan King Apr 3 '12 at 11:26
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You can use a Canvas in all modern browsers (incl. IE9). The following example won't work in IE7 and IE8, but I haven't tested there.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Line Test</title>
    <style type="text/css">
        #ruled {
            border: 1px solid red;
        }
        #textContainer {
            position: absolute;
            left: 0;
            top: 0;
            width: 580px;
            height: 1200px;
            font-size: 12px;
            margin: 10px;
            padding: 5px 10px;
            line-height: 20px;
        }
    </style>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function drawLines(){
            // get the canvas element using the DOM
            var canvas = document.getElementById('ruled');
            var currentLineY = 0;

            // Make sure we don't execute when canvas isn't supported
            if (canvas.getContext){

              // use getContext to use the canvas for drawing
              var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');
              ctx.strokeStyle = "#CCC";
              ctx.beginPath();
              // draw some lines (the +1.5 offsets the text baseline
              // and we use the .5 for crisp lines because the stroke()
              // method requires floats, not ints
              for (var i=1, imax=30; i<imax; i++) {
                currentLineY = i*20 + 1.5;
                ctx.moveTo(0,currentLineY);
                ctx.lineTo(600,currentLineY);
              }
              ctx.stroke();       
            } else {
              alert('You need a modern browser to see the lines.');
            }
        }           
    </script>
</head>

<body onload="drawLines()">

<canvas id="ruled" width="600" height="602"></canvas>
<div id="textContainer">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
<br><br>
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</div>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Best solution so far - I just need to modify it to detect the paragraph height. –  Ryan King Mar 24 '12 at 22:28
    
Maybe I could combine it with Julian's solution to work with em's. –  Ryan King Mar 24 '12 at 22:30
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