Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A << operator is used in UITableViewCell, as listed below:

enum {
     UITableViewCellStateDefaultMask                     = 0,
     UITableViewCellStateShowingEditControlMask          = 1 << 0,
     UITableViewCellStateShowingDeleteConfirmationMask   = 1 << 1
};

I had been to this post << operator in objective c enum? but still not clear about the use of << operator.

The same above mentioned Enum and be written as mentioned below, then why is it so, they have used << operator?

enum {
     UITableViewCellStateDefaultMask                     = 0,
     UITableViewCellStateShowingEditControlMask          = 1,
     UITableViewCellStateShowingDeleteConfirmationMask   = 2
};
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The post you have linked explains why quite clearly. The << operator in C shifts numbers left by the specified number of bits. By shifting a 1 into each column, it is easy to see that the enum options can be bitwise ORed together. This allows the enum options to be combined together using the | operator and held in a single integer. This would not work if the enum declaration was as follows:

enum {
     UITableViewCellStateDefaultMask                     = 0, (= 00 in binary)
     UITableViewCellStateShowingEditControlMask          = 1, (= 01 in binary)
     UITableViewCellStateShowingDeleteConfirmationMask   = 2, (= 10 in binary)
     UITableViewCellStateThatIJustMadeUpForThisExample   = 3  (= 11 in binary)
};

As 3 = 11 in binary, it is not possible to know from a single integer if you have the state UITableViewCellStateThatIJustMadeUpForThisExample or UITableViewCellStateShowingEditControlMask ORed with UITableViewCellStateShowingDeleteConfirmationMask.

share|improve this answer

The enum values give names to bits that are to be used in a bitmask. The bits in a bitmask by value are 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, ... (the powers of two). These values can be more clearly shown using the expressions (1<<0, 1<<1, 1<<2, 1<<3) -- i.e,. 1 shifted to the left by 0, 1, ... places. It's clearly and less error prone than listing the powers of 2 as decimal constants.

When you use the values, they are normally combined using a bitwise-OR operation ('|'). The goal is to specify zero or more bits, each of which has a specific meaning. Using a bitmask allows you to specify them independently but compactly. You may wish to read more on bitmasks for more details and examples.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.