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Let's say you have an enum like this:

public enum ColorsEnum
{
    Undefined,
    Blue,
    Red,
    Green
}

And a model like this:

public class Foo
{
    public ColorsEnum PreferedColor { get; set; }
}

With a view like this:

@model WebUI.Models.Foo

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    @Html.LabelFor(m => m.PreferedColor)
    @Html.DropDownListForEnum(m => m.PreferedColor)
    <input type="submit">
}

Here is the helper for the DropdownListForEnum:

    public static IHtmlString DropDownListForEnum<TModel, TProperty>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper,
                                                                     Expression<Func<TModel, TProperty>> expression)
    {
        var metaData = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, htmlHelper.ViewData);
        if (metaData.ModelType.IsEnum)
        {
            var names = Enum.GetNames(metaData.ModelType);
            var translatedNames = GetTranslatedNames(metaData.ModelType);

            var query = from p in names
                        select new SelectListItem
                                   {
                                       Text = translatedNames.ContainsKey(p) ? translatedNames[p] : p,
                                       Value = p,
                                       Selected = false
                                   };

            return htmlHelper.DropDownList(metaData.PropertyName, query.ToList());
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ApplicationException(
                "The DropDownListForEnum helper function must be used with an enum property");
        }
    }

My question: how do you perform validation (client & server side) to be sure a valid color is choosed by the user? 'Undefined' color should be refused by the validation process.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would use a nullable enum and a Required attribute on the view model:

public class MyViewModel
{
    [Required]
    public ColorsEnum? PreferedColor { get; set; }
}

So you could remove the Undefined value from your enum definition:

public enum ColorsEnum
{
    Blue,
    Red,
    Green
}

and then slightly modify your helper:

public static class HtmlExtensions
{
    public static IHtmlString DropDownListForEnum<TModel, TProperty>(
        this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper,
        Expression<Func<TModel, TProperty>> expression
    )
    {
        var metaData = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, htmlHelper.ViewData);
        var enumType = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(metaData.ModelType);
        if (enumType == null || !enumType.IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ApplicationException(
                "The DropDownListForEnum helper function must be used with a nullable enum property"
            );
        }

        var names = Enum.GetNames(enumType);
        var translatedNames = GetTranslatedNames(metaData.ModelType);

        var query = 
            from p in names
            select new SelectListItem
            {
                Text = translatedNames.ContainsKey(p) ? translatedNames[p] : p,
                Value = p,
                Selected = false
            };
        return htmlHelper.DropDownList(
            metaData.PropertyName, 
            query.ToList(), 
            "-- Select a color --"
        );
    }
}

and then have a simple controller to test:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View(new MyViewModel());
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(MyViewModel model)
    {
        return View(model);
    }
}

and a corresponding view:

@model MyViewModel

<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    @Html.LabelFor(m => m.PreferedColor)
    @Html.DropDownListForEnum(m => m.PreferedColor)
    <input type="submit" />
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thant's much more clear for me. Thank you. –  Bronzato Mar 25 '12 at 8:54

If the first value of every enum you plan on using with DropDownListForEnum is always a "default" option that should be rejected by the validator, you might consider making use of optionLabel parameter of DropDownList.

Pop the first element out of query and pass that string as your third parameter in DropDownList.

return htmlHelper.DropDownList(metaData.PropertyName, query.ToList(),
    /* some string containing default value extracted from your enum */);

That way, all DDLs created using DropDownListForEnum will use the first value of the enum as a "default" value, and all you would have to do to validate is to add a [Required] data annotation to PreferredColor.

Alternatively, you could remove the Default option from your enum and allow your HtmlHelper (or create a new one) to take a third parameter, a string containing the optionLabel that you would pass to DropDownList.

Either way, the idea is to make use of optionLabel as the validator will do all the work for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. It makes more sence to use optionLabel. So I removed my first value in enum (Undefined) and used an optionLabel. But when the view is generated, the optionLabel ("Please select...") is not selected, this is always the first item in my enum?? any idea? –  Bronzato Mar 24 '12 at 16:23
    
I think that might be because the DDL is bound to PreferredColor, and the default value of PreferredColor, after removing Default, becomes Blue. I'm more familiar with DDLs bound to ints, so I neglected to take that into account. An alternative might be to keep Default in your enum, but take a bool parameter in DropDownListForEnum that tells your HtmlHelper whether or not to extract the first value as optionLabel. That way, you can use it on all enums regardless whether the default option is included in the enum. –  nightshifted Mar 24 '12 at 16:34
    
@nightshifted An alternative might be adding a string[] excludeList to the parameters so you can optionally look at excluding any element from the enum. Would provide the same end result but a bit more flexibility? –  dreza Mar 24 '12 at 20:29

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