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Whenever I try to test my code with JUnit, I receive a NullPointerException - even though I don't get that exception when I run the actual program. The line that gives me the exception is:

assertEquals(0.0, TweetClassification.tweetType[TweetClassification.SIGNIF_OTHER].likelihoodA);

The beginning of the TweetClassification class it's testing is as follows:

public class TweetClassification
{

// CONSTANTS =============================================
public static final int TCNUMBER = 5; // number of TweetCategories (including the null category)

// using constants to indicate the names of the TweetCategories, so that they could be renumbered 
public static final int NULLTWEET = 0;
public static final int SIGNIF_OTHER = 1;
public static final int FRIENDS = 2;
public static final int WORK = 3;
public static final int FOOD = 4;

public static final TweetCategory[] tweetType = new TweetCategory[TCNUMBER];
...

(TweetCategory is another class that is defined separately within the package.) So I realize that this code initializes the array but not its members, and that's probably why I'm getting the exception(?) But the thing is, I do initialize the members of the array within the main method of TweetClassification, as follows:

for (int i=0; i<TCNUMBER; i++)
{
tweetType[i] = new TweetCategory();
}

But if I try to move this for loop outside the main method with the constants I get a syntax error - I presume you're not supposed to use a for loop outside of a method. So I'm not sure how to initialize the class properly for JUnit to work - either I do it outside the main method and get a syntax error, or I do it inside the main method and get a NullPointerException. Any ideas?

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Please show the code inside the main method too. –  Tudor Mar 24 '12 at 14:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to move the init code into a static initializer block, like this:

public class TweetClassification
{
  //...

  public static final TweetCategory[] tweetType = new TweetCategory[TCNUMBER];

  static
  {
    for (int i=0; i<TCNUMBER; i++)
    {
      tweetType[i] = new TweetCategory();
    }
  }

  //...
}

This ensures that the static variable is initialized properly when the class is loaded (i.e. before it is first used anywhere within your program or tests).

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Thank you, Péter! That was exactly what I needed. –  Displaced Hoser Mar 24 '12 at 17:09

Yo might find some use of the static initialzier block:

private static Integer arr[] = new Integer[2];
static {
    for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++) {
        arr[i] = 2;
    }
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(arr[1]);
}

Ouputs:

2

This is proper java and is meant exactly for initializing static variables, though it is not very commonly used.

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