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I have a file with structure like this:

[05:58:10 08.12.1990] 125.441
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] -2.4158
...

Where everything but the last colummn is some sort of timecode (different for every file) and I need to convert the last number to its opposite, like this:

[05:58:10 08.12.1990] -125.441
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] 2.4158
...

I tried it with awk, but since my knowledge of awk is quite poor I didn't quite achieve it. I first tried to add negative numbers with this:

awk '{$NF=" "; NF--; printf $0; NF++; if ($NF ~ /^[0-9].*/){printf "-"; print $NF}}'

but since I throw the last column away with NF--, I can't get it back with NF++.

Any help with this would be appreciated. Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
good answers below, but to follow up on your 'I can't get it back with NF++', well then, why not save it to a special variable, ie. myNF=NF; $NF=" "; NF--; ....print $(myNF).... Good luck. –  shellter Mar 27 '12 at 19:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

what about:

awk '  { if( $NF ~ /^-/ ){sub(/-/, "", $NF); print $0;} 
         else {sub(/^[1-9]*.[1-9]*/,"-"$NF,$NF); print $0}  } '


$ cat data 
[05:58:10 08.12.1990] 125.441
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] -2.4158
$ cat data | awk '  { if( $NF ~ /^-/ ){sub(/-/, "", $NF); print $0;} else {sub(/^[1-9]*.[1-9]*/,"-"$NF,$NF); print $0} }'
[05:58:10 08.12.1990] -125.441
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] 2.4158

edit: as William Purssell suggested, improved version of this script:

cat data | awk '  { if( $NF ~ /^-/ ){sub(/-/, "", $NF); print $0;} 
         else { $NF="-"$NF; print $0}} '
[05:58:10 08.12.1990] -125.441
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] 2.4158
[05:59:30 08.13.2000] -0.94630008768741448848
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for another version, but there is also one bug.. If I want to convert number between 0 and 1 I get the wrong number: I have: "[05:58:21 08.12.1990] 0.4158" and I'll get [05:58:21 08.12.1990] -0.4158.4158 and I see why, you are using 1-9 instead of 0-9. Now it works ok, thanks! –  user1290065 Mar 24 '12 at 15:42
1  
In the else clause, there's no need for sub. Just do $NF = "-"$NF –  William Pursell Mar 24 '12 at 16:24

Try :

awk '{$NF *= -1; print}'
share|improve this answer
    
That seems to work, but it rounded my number. I had 0.94630008768741448848 and awk rounded it to -0.9463 –  user1290065 Mar 24 '12 at 15:00
    
It is possible to adjust string<->number conversion using CONVFMT variable. But I would suggest to stick to another solution by @wisent –  Alexander Putilin Mar 24 '12 at 15:38

This might work for you:

sed 's/ \([0-9.]*\)$/ -\1/;t;s/\(.*\)-/\1/' file
[05:58:10 08.12.1990] -125.441
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] 2.4158

In essence:

  • If the last field is separated by a space prepend a -
  • Otherwise remove the last minus.
share|improve this answer
    
I must say that sed is still a little mystery for me, but this indeed works and it's also independendent on the format of a timecode as awk. I really thought that would be impossible with sed. Thanks for proving me wrong, I still have much to learn! –  user1290065 Mar 25 '12 at 11:22

Using sed:

Content of script.sed:

## Try to remove the negative sign.
s/\(\] \+\)-\(.*\)$/\1\2/

## If last substitution succeed, goto label 'a'.
ta

## If last substitution failed, there was not negative sign, so
## it is a positive number, I will have to add the sign just 
## before it.
s/\] \+/&-/

## Label 'a' at end of script. Here print line and read next one.
:a

Content of infile:

[05:58:10 08.12.1990] 125.441
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] -2.4158

Run it like:

sed -f script.sed infile

And result:

[05:58:10 08.12.1990] -125.441                                                                                                                                                                                                               
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] 2.4158
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for solution with sed, but the problem here is I can't be sure, that the timecode is in brackets. If the timecode would be for example in composed brackets, this would not work. But thanks anyway for the idea! –  user1290065 Mar 25 '12 at 11:02

http://www.nongnu.org/txr

$ txr -c '@(collect)
[@date] @{sign /-?/}@num
@(output)                                                         
[@date] @(if (equal sign "") "-" "")@num   
@(end)   
@(end)' < data.txt
[05:58:10 08.12.1990] 125.441
[05:58:21 08.12.1990] -2.4158
[05:59:30 08.13.2000] 0.94630008768741448848

This is more robust than the hacky solutions that blindly flip a minus sign by column, because we are doing some pattern matching on what the data looks like (and we can increase the amount of detail, if necessary).

But the @(collect) skips stuff that does not match. One thing we can do is throw an exception if there is some oddly shaped row:

$ txr -c '@(collect)
@(cases)
[@date] @{sign /-?/}@num
@(or)                                      
@(throw error "invalid data")
@(end)   
@(output)
[@date] @(if (equal sign "") "-" "")@num
@(end)
@(end)' < data.txt
share|improve this answer
    
txr looks really interesting, never heard about it. I'll try to read about it more, thanks! –  user1290065 Mar 25 '12 at 11:00

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