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I'm trying to make a cross platform console progress indicator in Java. Therefore I use the System.out.printf method to print out a percentage:

System.out.printf("\t%2.2f%%\b\b\b\b\b\b", percentage);

and I place this in a for loop. The problem I encounter is that it's not printing anything until the whole for loop is done. This is a program example to show the problem:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for(int i =0; i<5000; i++){
            System.out.printf("\b\b\b\b\b\b%2.2f%%", ((float) i/5000f)*100f);
            System.out.flush();
        }
    }
}

I think the problem has something to do with compiler optimisation, but I'm not shure. The strange thing is that System.out.println does print when the for loop is running.

Edit: I forgot to add it to the problem. But I had allready tried to flush the buffer. This makes no difference. Adding %n to the end of my printf line works but it starts a newline, I really need it to reuse the current line.

All opposed solutions work. But they only work in real consoles. Not the netbeans or eclipse console.

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Your code works for me, but is a bit fast, so I included a try { Thread.sleep (10); } catch (InterruptedException ignored) {}. –  user unknown Mar 24 '12 at 16:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's because the output stream is line buffered. If you add a "%n" at the end of your format string you also generate a line break and the line will be flushed (i.e. printed). Alternatively call System.out.flush() to manually flush the output stream and force buffered contents to be printed.

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Thanks for the flush tip! –  Tom Swifty Apr 11 at 18:53

And once more the problem is with flushing the stream. Add this line after your printf:

System.out.flush();

System.out.println is flushing (much like C++'s << endl). However, printf is not flushing and is using buffer.

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Flush is method so you need brackets for sure. –  Boris Strandjev Mar 24 '12 at 15:16
    
I had added brackets in my original code, I see they were not copied. I fixed it in the starting post. The problem is still not solved. –  Daan Pape Mar 24 '12 at 15:17
    
and what is the goal to replace the old characters with the new ones so you get something similar to counter? –  Boris Strandjev Mar 24 '12 at 15:19
    
I want to make a progress indicator. When I have like 5000 steps to calculate I don't want to print out 5000 lines but only one line showing the percentage of how much has been processed allready. –  Daan Pape Mar 24 '12 at 15:27
1  
I tried out your code. It works perfectly even without using flush... –  Boris Strandjev Mar 24 '12 at 15:36

Add a call to flush():

    for(int i =0; i<5000; i++){
        System.out.printf("\b\b\b\b\b\b%2.2f%%", ((float) i/5000f)*100f);
        System.out.flush();
    }

Without the flush(), the output gets accumulated in a buffer that only gets flushed once in a while (whenever it's full, or whenever a newline is printed).

The strange thing is that System.out.println does print when the for loop is running.

The reason for that is that the stream is line-buffered. This means that every newline triggers an implicit flush. The difference between your code and println() is that the latter prints out a newline every time it's called.

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Try using Console instead:

for(int i =0; i<5000; i++){
    System.console().format("\b\b\b\b\b\b%2.2f%%", ((float) i/5000f)*100f);
    System.console().flush();
}
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What platform? His code works for me: Java-1.6, Linux32. –  user unknown Mar 24 '12 at 16:53

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