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<?php

    $a = array(
        'a'=>'7833',
        'd'=>'1297',
        'c'=>'341',
        '1'=>'67',
        'b'=>'225',
        '3'=>'24',
        '2'=>'44',
        '4'=>'22',
        '0'=>'84'
    );

    ksort($a);

    print_r($a);

The above code produces the following output.

Array
(
    [0] => 84
    [a] => 7833
    [b] => 225
    [c] => 341
    [d] => 1297
    [1] => 67
    [2] => 44
    [3] => 24
    [4] => 22
)

Why does ksort give wrong result?

share|improve this question
1  
What would you consider the right result? –  salathe Mar 24 '12 at 16:12
    
I need to get the index sorted based on ASCII-table order. –  HabeebPerwad Mar 24 '12 at 16:32
    
Where would 10 go, between 1 and 2 or after 9? –  salathe Mar 24 '12 at 16:35
    
@salathe - According to ASCII order '10' can't be after '9', right? I got your point, but if ASCII order is what OP wants, fine. –  Wh1T3h4Ck5 Mar 24 '12 at 16:41
    
10 isn't an ASCII character (it is two characters), so saying "ASCII order" doesn't make sense, hence asking for clarification. –  salathe Mar 24 '12 at 16:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You'll want to use the SORT_STRING flag. SORT_REGULAR would compare items with their current types, in which case the number 1 does come after the string 'a':

php -r "echo 1 > 'a' ? 'yes' : 'no';" // yes
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 You're only person here who answered question "Why does ksort give wrong result?" –  Wh1T3h4Ck5 Mar 24 '12 at 16:21
    
@Wh1T3h4Ck5 no he's not. –  salathe Mar 24 '12 at 16:25
1  
@Wh1T3h4Ck5 You are right. Just giving solution may help to solve our problem. But won't help us to improve our programming skill. –  HabeebPerwad Mar 24 '12 at 16:26
    
I can't wait for the followup question, "Why does ksort SORT_STRING give wrong result?" when his numeric keys get into multiple digits. –  salathe Mar 24 '12 at 16:27

The default sorting uses SORT_REGULAR.

This takes the values and compares them as described on the comparison operators manual page. For the times when the string keys, in your example, are compared with zero; those strings are converted to numbers (all 0) for comparision. If two members compare as equal, their relative order in the sorted array is undefined. (Quoted from usort() manual page.)

If you want the sorted output to have numbers before letters, you should use SORT_NATURAL as of PHP 5.4. SORT_STRING will also do the job only if the numbers remain single digits.

SORT_NATURAL (PHP 5.4 or above) gives keys ordered as:

0,1,2,4,11,a,b,c

SORT_STRING gives keys ordered as:

0,1,11,2,4,a,b,c

An alternative to SORT_NATURAL for PHP less than 5.4, would be use uksort().

uksort($a, 'strnatcmp');
share|improve this answer

Try ksort($a, SORT_STRING) to force string comparisons on the keys.

share|improve this answer

This will work:

<?php ksort($a,SORT_STRING); ?>

Checkout the other sort_flags here http://www.php.net/manual/es/function.sort.php

Cheers!

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See this page for an overview of the different sort functions in php: http://php.net/manual/en/array.sorting.php

If you want it sorted by key, then use asort(), which produces this output:

Array
(
    [4] => 22
    [3] => 24
    [2] => 44
    [1] => 67
    [0] => 84
    [b] => 225
    [c] => 341
    [d] => 1297
    [a] => 7833
)
share|improve this answer
    
That's not sorting the keys, that's sorting the values. –  Andrew Kandels Mar 24 '12 at 16:26

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