Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I can implement a variable size matrix (of int) in C? For clarification, I must be able to add rows and columns in accordance with the facts of the situation (inside an if clause).

Thanks, Vi.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could write a reusable component separating interface from implementation. The main decision you should take is about implementing a sparse or dense allocation schema.

Assuming a dense schema, the object could be

in matrix.h

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct matrix {
  int nrows, ncols, *data;
} matrix;

matrix* allocate(matrix *mat, int nrows, int ncols);
int *cell(const matrix *mat, int row, int col);
matrix *addrow(matrix *mat);
matrix *addcol(matrix *mat);
matrix *print(FILE *f, matrix *mat);

in matrix.c

#include "matrix.h"
#include <assert.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

matrix* allocate(matrix *mat, int nrows, int ncols)
{
  assert(nrows > 0 && ncols > 0);
  mat->nrows = nrows;
  mat->ncols = ncols;
  mat->data = malloc(sizeof(int) * nrows * ncols);
  return mat;
}

int *cell(const matrix *mat, int row, int col)
{
  assert(row >= 0 && row < mat->nrows);
  assert(col >= 0 && col < mat->ncols);
  return mat->data + row * mat->ncols + col;
}

matrix *addrow(matrix *mat)
{
  mat->nrows++;
  mat->data = realloc(mat->data, sizeof(int) * mat->nrows * mat->ncols);
  return mat;
}

/* adding a column it's an expensive operation */
matrix *addcol(matrix *mat)
{
  mat->ncols++;
  mat->data = realloc(mat->data, sizeof(int) * mat->nrows * mat->ncols);

  /* shift rows' elements, to make room for last column */
  for (int r = mat->nrows - 1; r > 0; --r)
  {
    int *dest = mat->data + r * mat->ncols,
        *orig = mat->data + r * (mat->ncols - 1);
    memmove(dest, orig, sizeof(int) * (mat->ncols - 1));
  }
  return mat;
}

matrix *print(FILE *f, matrix *mat)
{
    for (int r = 0; r < mat->nrows; ++r)
    {
        for (int c = 0; c < mat->ncols; ++c)
            fprintf(f, "%4d ", *cell(mat, r, c));
        fprintf(f, "\n");
    }
    return mat;
}

int main_matrix(int argc, char **argv)
{
    matrix m;
    allocate(&m, 3, 5);

    for (int r = 0; r < m.nrows; ++r)
        for (int c = 0; c < m.ncols; ++c)
            *cell(&m, r, c) = 35;
    print(stdout, &m);
    fprintf(stdout, "\n");

    addrow(&m);
    for (int c = 0; c < m.ncols; ++c)
        *cell(&m, m.nrows - 1, c) = 45;
    print(stdout, &m);
    fprintf(stdout, "\n");

    addcol(&m);
    for (int r = 0; r < m.nrows; ++r)
        *cell(&m, r, m.ncols - 1) = 46;
    print(stdout, &m);
    fprintf(stdout, "\n");

    // remember to free memory
    free(m.data);

    return argc;
}

test output :

  35   35   35   35   35 
  35   35   35   35   35 
  35   35   35   35   35 

  35   35   35   35   35 
  35   35   35   35   35 
  35   35   35   35   35 
  45   45   45   45   45 

  35   35   35   35   35   46 
  35   35   35   35   35   46 
  35   35   35   35   35   46 
  45   45   45   45   45   46 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank u so much, I've understand my error! –  user1288707 Mar 24 '12 at 19:19

As I see you don't want to declare like: int arr[5][5];

You can do my using malloc and realloc. For example to create a 2D array dynamically:

int nrows;
int ncolumns;

scanf("%d %d", &nrows, &ncolumns);

int **arr = malloc(nrows * sizeof(int *));
    for(i = 0; i < nrows; i++)
        arr[i] = malloc(ncolumns * sizeof(int));

Then to realloc if you want change the size. The advtantage of using realloc is that it automatically takes care of copying the values from original memory locations to new location in case if if it can't extend the memory in the same region.

Note that here its for 2D array. If you want to change the dimension itself or If you want to be able to modify dimensions then you may code similar to the above with a different function for each of such case. Again, this is going to look a bit ugly. But there's no elegant way to do such things in C.

share|improve this answer

Just because C doesn't have language support for object-oriented ideas such as encapsulation and information hiding doesn't mean you can't use them in your code; you just have to work harder to put them into effect.

It's been too long since I've written C to be more specific, but Eric Roberts at Stanford taught some great techniques in a C programming course. I'd recommend that you look into them.

The idea would be that you'll have to remalloc the memory for the newly sized matrix, copy the old elements into it, initialize the new values, clean up the old memory, and assign the new matrix to the pointer variable. If you hide all this in a method, clients of your code will merely call it and not worry about the magic you're doing underneath. You won't have to repeat the complexities in several places. You'll just call one method and be done with it.

share|improve this answer

Once you know the size, you have to allocate enough space on the heap to accommodate for that size. You can allocate space on the heap with malloc or calloc.

For example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void set_value(int * matrix, int row, int col, int value);
int get_value(int * matrix, int row, int col);

int main() {
    int rows = 5; /* arbitrary */
    int cols = 3; /* arbitrary */
    int * matrix = (int *) calloc(rows * cols, sizeof(int));

    if (matrix == NULL) {
        printf("Error with allocation!\n");
        return -1;
    }

    set_value(matrix, 0, 0, 5);
    set_value(matrix, 0, 1, 2);
    set_value(matrix, 4, 2, 1);

    printf("%d\n", get_value(matrix, 0, 0));
    printf("%d\n", get_value(matrix, 0, 1));
    printf("%d\n", get_value(matrix, 4, 2));

    free(matrix);

    return 0;
}

void set_value(int * matrix, int row, int col, int value) {
    *(matrix + col * sizeof(int) + row) = value;
}

int get_value(int * matrix, int row, int col) {
    return *(matrix + col * sizeof(int) + row);
}

Just make sure you always check that the call to malloc or calloc worked and that you always free the memory later with free.

If you ever need to resize the matrix, you will have to either use realloc or ask for more space on the heap, copy your values over, and free the older memory.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know the size when I start. I would add rows and columns step-by-step according to conditional clauses. –  user1288707 Mar 24 '12 at 17:15

i think you can create a buffer with dynamic memory allocation "malloc"

share|improve this answer
1  
Welcome to SO! When answering questions, try to be specific and include code where you can. –  lnafziger Mar 25 '12 at 4:01

I just wrote it... Hope it'll work.

int **matrix;

int m=10;
int n=10;

int i,j;

matrix = (int)** malloc (m*sizeof(int*));
for(i=0;i<m;i++){
matrix[i]= (int)* malloc (n*sizeof(int));
for(j=0;j<n;j++)
matrix[i][j] = (10.0*rand());
}

free(matrix);
share|improve this answer
    
big memory leak on freeing just matrix –  William Morris Mar 24 '12 at 17:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.