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I have 2 strings:

I have 4 cars in my house
I have 14 cars in my house

How do we use ruby (1.9.3) regex to check only 1 to 10 car are matched?

Ex:

I have 1 car in my house # => match
I have 4 cars in my house # => match
I have 10 cars in my house # => match
I have 14 cars in my house # => should not match
I have 100 cars in my house # => should not match

Also, how do we match (i.e. 2 cars) against any strings? so that if the target string contains '22 cars' then it should not match.

Ex:

some other string before 2 cars some other string after # => match
some other string before 22 cars some other string after # => should not match    
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2  
What about /I have (1 car|[2-9] cars|10 cars) in my house/? –  Howard Mar 24 '12 at 16:46
1  
Should'nt your cars be in your garage? :D Howard provides the correct answer. I first missed the singular form. –  alfa Mar 24 '12 at 16:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Regular expression: /I have (?:1 car|[2-9] cars|10 cars) in my house/

You can try that interatively at http://rubular.com/

The (?:xxx) makes parenthesis non-capturing as stated here.

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Works perfectly, thanks everyone! Actually, my problem is I have a string (i.e. 2 cars) and I want to check if it match against any strings contain '2 cars'. So in this case if the target string contains '22 cars' then it should not match. –  Hoang Nghiem Mar 26 '12 at 3:06
    
Use .* to match any string before and after the number of cars. –  alfa Mar 26 '12 at 7:56
    
This still match the string "I have 22 cars in my house". –  Hoang Nghiem Mar 26 '12 at 9:15
    
You should really learn how to write your own regular expressions. This one works: "I have 22 cars in my house"[/.* (?:1 car|[2-9] cars|10 cars) .*/] => nil –  alfa Mar 26 '12 at 13:41
    
Thanks alfa, all good now. –  Hoang Nghiem Mar 27 '12 at 2:19

Use this RegExp: /I have ([1-9]|10) cars? in my house./

The [1-9] creates a range of 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 and the pipe character acts as an or to allow for 10. The parenthesis are a capture group. The question mark after the 's' at the end of cars means "zero or one of the preceeding character" and therefore matches both 'car' and 'cars'. Hope this helped!

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This solution is simpler than mine. It has the drawback that "I have 10 car in my house." or "I have 1 cars in my house." match. It is sufficient for the listed use cases but I don't think this is what Hoang Nghiem intended. ;) Btw: . matches any character. It should be \. –  alfa Mar 24 '12 at 17:02
    
That's true - good catch! What is the benefit of the parenthesis being non-capturing though? –  Paul Simpson Mar 24 '12 at 17:04
    
If you only want to know whether the whole sentence matched and don't care about the number you should do this. Maybe you want to capture something else later in the regexp and don't want to get confused with the indices. –  alfa Mar 24 '12 at 17:08
    
Ahh I see. Thanks for explaining! –  Paul Simpson Mar 24 '12 at 17:13
    
How do we match number in range follow by string in any strings? please see my updated question. –  Hoang Nghiem Mar 26 '12 at 3:12

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