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I'm trying to do this, what is the most powerful way to attain this goal ?

#!/bin/bash

# Remove DOGS from CATSNDOGS to give CATS

DOGS="fido rover oscar bowwow spike max"

CATSNDOGS="bowwow figaro pussy oscar boots rover kitty max spike meowser fluffles fido"

CATS="" #?? How do I do this?
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7 Answers 7

The comm answer is innovative, but of course not the only method. You can also do this purely in bash, without using extra tools.

#!/bin/bash

DOGS="fido rover oscar bowwow spike max"
CATSNDOGS="bowwow figaro pussy oscar boots rover kitty max spike meowser fluffles fido"

# make an associative array...
declare -A dogs_a
for dog in $DOGS; do
  dogs_a[$dog]=1;
done

CATS=""
# step through everything
for beast in $CATSNDOGS; do
  # if it's not a dog...
  if [ -z "${dogs_a[$beast]}" ]; then
    CATS="$CATS $beast"
  fi
done

echo $CATS

Note that this also relies on spaces as field separators, and you should read about always wrapping your variables in quotes when programming in bash.

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Pure Bash (note the blanks):

CATS=" $CATSNDOGS "

for dog in  $DOGS ; do
  CATS=${CATS/ $dog / }
done

echo -e "CATS : '$CATS'"

The result:

CATS : ' figaro pussy boots kitty meowser fluffles '
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You could do it with the program comm. The -3 option gets rid of matching lines (not words), and the inputs need to be sorted, so there is a little more to it. Something like this:

comm -3 <(echo $DOGS | tr ' ' '\n' | sort) <(echo $CATSNDOGS | tr ' ' '\n' | sort)

To support your original input format (with spaces) and avoid creating temporary files, we transform spaces to newlines, sort both inputs, and use them as "virtual" file arguments to comm.

Edit: I didn't capture the output, it'll just be printed to stdout. You could say CATS=$(...) to store it, though you may need to massage it slightly to get back to spaces if that's what you want.

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It breaks if a dog is not in $CATSNDOGS. To solve this, the -1 option could be added. –  jfgagne Mar 24 '12 at 23:15

another approach:

for i in $CATSNDOGS
do
        skip=0
        for j in $DOGS
        do
                if [ "$j" == "$i" ]; then
                        skip=1
                else
                        continue
                fi
        done
        if [ "$skip" == "0" ]; then
          CATS="$CATS $i"
        else
          continue
        fi
done

echo -e "cats: $CATS"

However I like ghoti's version with associative arrays more.

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In a single command, keeping the order of the cats, but using complex sed logic:

sed -e 'N;s/^/ /;s/$/ /;s/\n/ \n /;bbegin' \
    -e ':begin;s/ \(.*\) \(.*\)\n\(.*\) \1 / \2\n\3 /;tbegin' \
    -e 's/^ //;s/ \n //' << EOF
$CATSNDOGS
$DOGS
EOF

This is the logic explained:

  1. Put $CATSNDOGS and $DOGS on the same line, delimited by a new line (\n).
  2. Add a space before and after $CATSNDOGS and $DOGS to ease the following logic.
  3. If a word is found before and after the newline, remove it.
  4. Try again above as long as a word is remove.
  5. Before printing, remove the leading space and trailing space and new line.

Edit:

I realize that above breaks if a dog is not in $CATSNDOG or if a dog is twice in $CATSNDOG. The improved version is:

sed -e 'N;s/^/ /;s/$/ /;s/\n/ \n /;bbegin' \
    -e ':begin;s/ \(.*\) \(.*\)\n\(.*\) \1 / \2\n\3 \1 /;tbegin' \
    -e 's/^ //;s/ \n.*//' << EOF
$CATSNDOGS
$DOGS
EOF
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Oooh, +1 for fancy sed. :) –  ghoti Mar 25 '12 at 15:03

This is a job for join using the print unpairable lines (-a) argument. Then we keep the lines ending with a space, and remove that space. To avoid using temporary files, we use bash process substitution.

join -a 1 -j 1 -o 1.1,2.1 \
  <(tr " " "\n" <<< "$CATSNDOGS" | sort) \
  <(tr " " "\n" <<< "$DOGS" | sort) | sed -e '/ $/!d;s/ //'

It looses the initial order of $CATSNDOGS, but we could easily add a cat -n and a sort to get back the initial ordering.

To put that back in a variable, do:

CATS="$(join -a 1 -j 1 -o 1.1,2.1 \
  <(tr " " "\n" <<< "$CATSNDOGS" | sort) \
  <(tr " " "\n" <<< "$DOGS" | sort) | sed -e '/ $/!d;s/ //' | paste -s -d " ")"
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another bash-only approach

cats=()
for animal in $CATSNDOGS; do
  if [[ " $DOGS " == *" $animal "* ]]; then
    # animal is a dog
  else
    cats+=$animal
  fi
done
echo "${cats[@]}"
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