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Scenario A.java-----------after erasure-------->M.class

Scenario B.java-----------after erasure-------->M.class

Then why A is illegal and B is legal since they have almost the same M after erasure.

Scenario A before erasure:

 class ArrayList<V> {
 private V[] backingArray;
         public ArrayList() {
             backingArray = new V[DEFAULT_SIZE]; // illegal
           }
 }

Scenario A after erasure:

 class ArrayList<V> {   
   private Object[] backingArray;   
      public ArrayList() {
      backingArray = new Object[DEFAULT_SIZE]; // this is not useful   
   } 
}

actually the Object[Default_Size] is useful ~ Scenario B before erasure:

class ArrayList<V> {
  private V[] backingArray;
  public ArrayList() {
    backingArray = (V[]) new Object[DEFAULT_SIZE]; 
  }
}

Scenario B after erasure:

class ArrayList<V> {
  private Object[] backingArray;
  public ArrayList() {
    backingArray = (Object[]) new Object[DEFAULT_SIZE]; 
  }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The reason that Scenario A is illegal is that Java's covariant arrays are not implemented via erasure. This:

Object[] foo = new String[4];
foo[0] = new Object();

will raise an ArrayStoreException at run-time, because foo refers to an array instance that knows it's a String[] (even though it's referred to via the variable foo, which has compile-time type Object[]). So this:

new V[4]

is illegal, because the run-time won't know what type of array instance to create.

share|improve this answer
    
so you mean the code Scenario A after Erasure is wrong ? because backingArray = new V[DEFAULT_SIZE]; will not become backingArray = new Object[DEFAULT_SIZE]; –  iamx7777777 Mar 24 '12 at 21:17
    
As you saw, it gives a compile error. So it won't become anything: not new Object[DEFAULT_SIZE], and not anything else. It's just like how new V() can't become new Object(). –  ruakh Mar 24 '12 at 21:19
    
thanks very much , And another question about this ,do you think it will be fine if compiler compile Scenario-A-before into Scenario-A-after? I think there will be no difference if compiler just convert V->Object. –  iamx7777777 Mar 24 '12 at 21:28
    
If V is String, then the example @ruakh gives could cause an ArrayStoreException under certain conditions. But basically, arrays and generics just really play badly together. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 24 '12 at 21:41
    
Oh~@LouisWasserman and @ruakh thanks so much !! i'm clearer now. –  iamx7777777 Mar 25 '12 at 1:49

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