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Here it is:

//Disable KeyboardNavigation
document.getElementById("author").onfocus = function() { 
document.onkeyup = null;
};
document.getElementById("email").onfocus = function() { 
document.onkeyup = null;
};
document.getElementById("url").onfocus = function() {
document.onkeyup = null;
};
document.getElementById("comment").onfocus = function() {
document.onkeyup = null;
};

//Enable KeyboardNavigation
document.getElementById("author").onblur = function() {
document.onkeyup = KeyCheck;
};
document.getElementById("email").onblur = function() { 
document.onkeyup = KeyCheck;
};
document.getElementById("url").onblur = function() { 
document.onkeyup = KeyCheck;
};
document.getElementById("comment").onblur = function() { 
document.onkeyup = KeyCheck;
};

I believe it's definitely possible to write a better code with a loop but I really don't know how to make it work. I tried the following:

var formfields= ["author", "email", "url", "comment"];
for (i=1; i<=3; i++){
//Don't really know what to put in here.
}

Thank you in advance for your help!

EDIT : Whole code is below. You should know that I got some help to get to this result:

document.onkeyup = KeyCheck;       

var pages = [
"http://", 
"http://", 
"http://", 
"http://", 
"http://"];

function leftarrowpressed() {
location.href = pages[ Math.max(0, 0 - 1) ]; 
//The second '0' here changes from 0 to 4, according to the page.
}

function rightarrowpressed() {
location.href = pages[ Math.min(pages.length - 1, 0 + 1) ];
//The second '0' here changes from 0 to 4, according to the page.
}

function KeyCheck(e)
{
   var KeyID = (window.event) ? event.keyCode : e.keyCode;

   switch(KeyID)
   {

// left arrow key
     case 37:
     leftarrowpressed();    
      break;

//  right arrow key
      case 39:
      rightarrowpressed(); 
      break; 
   }
}

Hope this can help a little more. By the way, thank you everyone. I really don't know which solution to choose.

share|improve this question
1  
What are you actually trying to achieve with that code? –  David Thomas Mar 24 '12 at 21:19
    
I have a keyboard navigation on my site. The problem is that when people want to write something in input fields, they can't because specific keys trigger the navigation. That is what I want to avoid. I will put the whole code in my question. –  Macxim Mar 24 '12 at 21:57

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like what you are doing is trying to prevent keystrokes in an input element from affecting navigation. What you could do instead is check event.target in KeyCheck and only perform the action if it was not triggered by an input element.

function KeyCheck(e) {
    var target = e ? e.target : event.srcElement, //standards vs IE
        tagname = target.tagName.toLowerCase();
    if( tagname !== "input" && tagname !== "textarea" && tagname !== "select") {
        //Not from an input, NAVIGATE!
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Though be aware that a textarea isn't an input either. –  David Thomas Mar 24 '12 at 22:10
    
Good catch. Added select too, just for completeness. –  Dennis Mar 24 '12 at 22:16
    
That is the solution I chose! Thank you very much for your help! It's pretty easy to adapt to any website. That's why I liked it. –  Macxim Mar 24 '12 at 22:43

If using jQuery then you can go a more straight-forward way: inside KeyCheck, check whether any of the elements is focused, and don't do anything in that case. You won't need any of the above.

function KeyCheck(e) {
  if($("#author, #email, #url, #comment").is(":focus")) {
    return;  // ignore if any of these elements has focus
  }

  // ...
}

Make sure to bind KeyCheck using jQuery too:

$("body").on("keyup", KeyCheck);
share|improve this answer
    
A very clean and very simple, yet efficient solution! Thank you! –  Macxim Mar 24 '12 at 22:45
var formfields= ["author", "email", "url", "comment"];
for (i=0; i<=3; i++){
      var field = document.getElementById(formFields[i]);
      field.onfocus = function() { 
          document.onkeyup = null;
      };
      field.onblur = function() { 
          document.onkeyup = KeyCheck;
      };
}

or more proper way would be to use something like this

jQuery.each("author email url comment".split(" "), function(i, name) {
    $('#' + name).focus(function() {
       // do whatever you want to do
    }).blur(function() {
      // do whatever you wnat to do
    ));
});
share|improve this answer

Neat and readable:

var formfields = ["author", "email", "url", "comment"],
    i, elem,
    blur = function() {   document.onkeyup = KeyCheck; },
    focus = function() {  document.onkeyup = null;     };
for (i=0; i<=3; i++) {
    elem = document.getElementById(formFields[i]);
    elem.onblur = blur;
    elem.onfocus = focus;
}
share|improve this answer

look for the nearest common parent for these elements and add a handler to it. we can use the powers of delegation using the .on() as well as method chaining to bind a hander only to the parent (in this case, 2 handlers for all, not 8 where 2 per element) to take effect on all 4 elements.

var selectors = '#author, #email, #url, #comment';

$('nearest_parent_element').on('focus', selectors, function() {
    document.onkeyup = null;
}).on('blur', selectors, function() {
    document.onkeyup = KeyCheck;
});​
share|improve this answer

jQuery way:

$("#author, #email, #url, #comment").on({
    focus: function() {
        $(document).on('keyup', null);
    },
    blur: function() {
        $(document).on('keyup', KeyCheck);
    }
});
share|improve this answer

It all depends on how good you are at JavaScript. I would recommend for you to use event delegation: http://jsfiddle.net/teresko/PkCuZ/3/

It might look a bit complicated , but the add_listener() function would be shared throughout the whole code , so the payload actually looks like this:

var handlers = {
    keyout: function(e){  
        var event = e || window.event, 
            target = event.target || event.srcElement;
        console.log( 'leaving ' + target.name ); 
    },
    keyin: function(e){
         var event = e || window.event, 
            target = event.target || event.srcElement;
        console.log( 'entering ' + target.name );
    }
},
container = document.getElementById('container');


add_listener( container, 'blur' , handlers.keyout );
add_listener( container, 'focus' , handlers.keyin );   

This would work with any number of form elements.

As for the add_listener() function , it contains a small fix for blur/focus on IE, and a per-application choice of which method of attaching events to use. It's kinda an universal function which you can just drop in, when you need a common interface for attaching listeners:

var add_listener = (function () {
    var fix = {
        'focus':    'focusin',
        'blur':     'focusout'
    };
    if ( window.addEventListener ) {
        return function ( element, type, callback ) {
            element.addEventListener(type, callback, typeof(fix[type]) !== undefined );
        };
    }else{
        return function ( element, type, callback ) {
            type = fix[type] || type;
            element.attachEvent('on' + type, callback);
        };        
    }
})();
share|improve this answer
    
As you said, it does look complicated. –  Macxim Mar 24 '12 at 22:23

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