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I am comparing two strings, in Java, to see how many characters from the first string show up in the second string. The following is some expectations:

matchingChars("AC", "BA") → 1  
matchingChars("ABBA", "B") → 2  
matchingChars("B", "ABBA") → 1  

My approach is as follows:

 public int matchingChars(String str1, String str2) {

    int count = 0;

     for (int a = 0; a < str1.length(); a++)
    {    
        for (int b = 0; b < str2.length(); b++)

          {  char str1Char = str1.charAt(a);
             char str2Char = str2.charAt(b);

                if (str1Char == str2Char)
                   {   count++;
                       str1 =  str1.replace(str1Char, '0');
                   }
          }
    }
     return count; 
    }  

I know my approach is not the best, but I think it should do it. However, for

   matchingChars("ABBA", "B") → 2  

My code yields "1" instead of "2". Does anyone have any suggestion or advice? Thank you very much.

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5 Answers 5

Assuming that comparing "AABBB" with "AAAABBBCCC" should return 15 (2*3 + 3*3 + 0*3) then:

For each string make a Map from the character of the string to the count of characters. Compute the intersection of the keysets for the two maps. For each element in the keyset accumulate the product of the values. Print the result. This is linear in the size of the two strings.

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Is it ok to supply working code on homework problems?

public long testStringCount() {
  String a = "AABBBCCC";
  String b = "AAABBBDDDDD";

  Map<Character,Integer> aMap = mapIt(a);
  Map<Character,Integer> bMap = mapIt(b);

  Set<Character> chars = Sets.newHashSet(aMap.keySet());
  chars.addAll(bMap.keySet());

  long result = 0;
  for (Character c : chars) {
    Integer ac = aMap.get(c);
    Integer bc = bMap.get(c);
    if (null != ac && null != bc) {
     result += ac*bc;
    }
  }
  return result;
}

private Map<Character, Integer> mapIt(String a) {
 Map<Character,Integer> result = Maps.newHashMap();
 for (int i = 0; i < a.length(); i++) {
   Character c = a.charAt(i);
   Integer x = result.get(c);
   if (null == x) {
     x = 0;
   }
   x++;
   result.put(c, x);
 }
 return result;
}
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Clearly you have to make sure you only count unique characters from string 1. You're double-counting B because you're counting B's twice, once for each occurrence in string 1.

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Well your code is only showing 1 because of this line:

str1 =  str1.replace(str1Char, '0');

That's turning "ABBA" into "A00A" - so the second B doesn't get seen.

Perhaps you should turn the second string into a HashSet<Character> instead... then you could just use something like:

int count = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < str1.length; i++)
{
    if (otherSet.contains(str1.charAt(i))
    {
        count++;
    }
}

It's not clear what result you want to get from "ABBA" / "CBCB" - if it's 2 (because there are 2 Bs) then the above approach will work. If it's 4 (because each of the 2 Bs in the first string matches 2 Bs in the second string) then all you need to do is get rid of your replace call.

EDIT: With the clarifications, it sounds like you could just do this:

for (int a = 0; a < str1.length(); a++)
{    
    for (int b = 0; b < str2.length(); b++)
    {  
        if (str1.charAt(a) == str2.charAt(b))
        {
            count++;
            // Terminate the inner loop which is iterating over str2,
            // and move on to the next character in str1
            break;
        }
    }
}
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Hi Jon, I thought it only replaces the character at the current index instead of replacing all characters that are the same, so I'm looking to see A0BA after the first check. I haven't learned anything about HashSet and do not know how to use it. But if you are willing, could you please walk me through? –  Chauduyphanvu Mar 24 '12 at 22:00
    
And "CBCB" should yield 2 for the 2 B's. Could we extract the characters from the strings and populate two ArrayLists using them? –  Chauduyphanvu Mar 24 '12 at 22:02
    
@VũChâu: No, replace will replace all the occurrences. There's no such concept as a "current index" within a string. It sounds like rather than changing the string, it would be simpler just to use a break statement to break out of the inner loop, so you move on to the next character in str1. –  Jon Skeet Mar 24 '12 at 22:03
    
@VũChâu: You can use String.toCharArray to create a char[], and Arrays.asList to create a list view onto an array. You can then create a set from the list, should you wish to. But as a simple break statement would do the trick here, I suggest you use that. Will update my post. –  Jon Skeet Mar 24 '12 at 22:05
    
Thanks Jon, a break statement works! –  Chauduyphanvu Mar 24 '12 at 22:06

Your solution works, but is quadratic. If all characters are below 256, then you can do something like this:

int matching(String s1, String s2) {
int[] count1 = frequencies(s1);
int[] count2 = frequencies(s2);
sum = 0;
for(int i =  0; i< 256; i++) {
    sum += count1[i]*count2[i] != 0 ? Math.max(count1[i], count2[i]) : 0;
}
return sum;
}

int[] frequencies(String s) {
int[] ret = new int[256];
for(char c : s) {
    int[c]+=1;
}
}

Otherwise, you'll need a multiset.

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