Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been working with XML for a while now, but some things I have just used without really understanding why they work the way they do. Now I would like to change that.

This question is about namespaces.

This is what I think I have understood so far:

  1. The namespace can be any string. It is meant to be a unique identifier world wide.
  2. In order to qualify an XML element with a namespace, you cannot simply prefix the namespace in front of the element name, you need to use a separate prefix which needs to be declared at the beginning of the scope you want to apply the namespace to.
  3. You are free to choose the prefix.
  4. You are not free to choose the namespace (?)
  5. Although a namespace doesn't necessarily reference anything as a URL, it can very well reference a targetNamespace.

Now, my question, does every namespace reference a targetNamespace ? When I declare xsi to be the prefix for XML Schema, does XML Schema declare that same namespace as its targetNamespace somewhere ? (where?). When I declare xsl to be the prefix for the XSLT namespace, does that mean that the XSLT namespace is declared somewhere as targetNamespace (where?)?

If we can have namespaces without any reference to a targetNamespace, in what situations would we use them? Why would we need them ?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You were doing OK until

  1. You are not free to choose the namespace (?)

Whether or not you are free to choose the namespace depends on what you want to do. If you are making up a new vocabulary you get to choose the namespace (or no namespace). if you want to use an existing vocabulary such as XHTML or MathML or DocBook or ... then if course, you have to use the namespace specified.

  1. Although a namespace doesn't necessarily reference anything as a URL, it can very well reference a targetNamespace.

Terminology problem here I think so I'm not sure what you mean. the namespace spec itself does not have any concept of "targetNamespace". The term is used of a w3c XML schema to say which namespace the elements described in the schema come from the "target namespace" of the schema. So it isn't a term you can really apply to a single instance of a namespace in an XML document.

so....

Now, my question, does every namespace reference a targetNamespace ?

As noted above I'm not sure this question has meaning, but the answer is essentially "no".

When I declare xsi to be the prefix for XML Schema, does XML Schema declare that same namespace as its targetNamespace somewhere ?

there is a schema for schema that declares the attributes used traditionally for the xsi prefix, and in that sense it will have this namespace as its target namespace, yes.

If we can have namespaces without any reference to a targetNamespace, in what situations would we use them? Why would we need them ?

Any namespace defined without reference to XSD schema doesn't have anything that could be called a targetNamespace. However if you have an XSD based workflow you can always create such a schema, either from scratch or by converting a DTd or RelaxNg schema. So whether or not there is an XSD schema for a namespace is not an inherent property of the namespace. So for example the XHTML namespace http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml for a long time (and again, in its html5 incarnation) does not have any official XSD schema associated that has that URI as its target namespace.

share|improve this answer
1  
David, thank you so much for your detailed reply. 1. I think I fully agree with your first remark. Sorry for the lack of clarity. 2. Very interesting fact, which gets to the heart of my question. If you have a NS without targetNS/without XML Schema, do NS merely serve as disambiguation between synonymous element names? p.s. I don't have enough reputation to vote for your answers :-(((. –  Student Mar 26 '12 at 8:45
    
The namespace is simply part of the name, so you could say it serves to disambiguate but only in the same way that names that begin with "A" are disambiguated from names that begin with "B". As I noted in my reply it doesn't make sense to say "a namespace has a tartget namespace". It is a schema that may have a target namespace, it is a property of the schema, not a property of the namespace. –  David Carlisle Mar 26 '12 at 8:53
    
The namespace is simply part of the name. Describing it that way may actually help me a lot. XML element names could then be seen as abbreviated forms (suffixes) of the full(ly qualified) name (that reminds me, I was always wondering if you could prefix an xml element with the full namespace string, not just the short prefix. I never found any explanation saying you could... (?) ). At the same time, the NS serves as a grouping of terms into families sharing some conceptual universe. In that sense the convention-aspect doesn't seem so bad either. –  Student Mar 26 '12 at 12:36

"targetNamespace" is essentially the relationship between a schema document and a namespace. A schema document is associated with a namespace, and the namespace it is associated with is called its target namespace, rather in the way that every person is associated with a number called their year of birth. Asking whether "every namespace has a targetNamespace" is therefore a bit like asking whether every number has a year of birth.

Perhaps your question is, does every namespace have a schema? The answer to that is no. You can create a namespace without creating a schema for it. Indeed, you can have many different schemas for the same namespace.

share|improve this answer
1  
Michael, thank you for answering my question. Allow me to follow up on some of the things that remain unclear to me. 1. Your analogy proves that I have yet to grasp the true meanings of namespace and targetNamespace. Can any helpful analogies be made with Java packages, e.g. ? 2. I'm very glad for your remark about many schemas for the same NS. Let's say I have namespace "abc" and schema A and B have targetNS as "abc" as well. Would it make sense for A and B to have conflicting element definitions? When would it make sense to have A and B share the same targetNS? –  Student Mar 26 '12 at 8:38
    
p.s. I don't have enough reputation to vote for your answers :-(((. –  Student Mar 26 '12 at 8:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.